More Starfinder Magic and Hybrid Items

Just more random ideas for updates of some of the sillier classic magic items.

Air-Horn of Opening
Magic Item
Level: Varies (see text)     Cost: Varies (see text)
Bulk: L

Air-horns of opening can be found at various item levels. They have the same price as the cheapest armor upgrade of the same level from the Starfinder Core Rulebook. An air-horn of opening can be pointed at any sealed or shut door, lock, or other closing and, when it’s loud sound is blasted as a standard action at the closure, magically opening it. The air-horn attempts an Engineering check to disable device with a total bonus equal to it’s item level +5. If an air-horn of opening fails to open a closure on the first attempt, it can never successfully open it.
An air-horn of opening can only be used twice per day. Alternatively it can can be used once as a full round action, which grants it an additional +5 bonus, but the item’s magic is then expended and it becomes mundane and worthless. An air-horn of opening can only function in a gas atmosphere, and only at a range of 15 feet. it can normally be heard 500 feet away, and if the sound from the air-horn cannot reach the opening for some reason, it does not function.

Torpedo Minisub, Folding
Hybrid Item
Level: 4     Cost: 2,750 credits
Bulk: 1 (see text)
At the press of a button this torpedo minisub (see Vehicles in Chapter 7: Equipment of the Starfinder Core Rulebook) folds, spins, and transforms its shape until it is down to a 1-foot cube weighing 10 lbs. It can only do this if it is empty of any creatures of cargo, and it takes 1 minute. When in cube form it can be placed in a large enough body of unobstructed water to support it, in which case it unfolds and expands back into a torpedo minisub over 1 minute.

Speaking of Things of Value

I have a Patreon, which supports my efforts to make blog posts here. I even post things to it from time to time that are (at least at first) Patreon-exclusive. Like the trenchcoat of the bat!

The First Starfinder Roleplaying Game Content Post!

So, obviously I’ve been thinking a lot about Starfinder-compatible material that could go up here. It has to be material I thought off on my own time (rather than while doing Paizo work), and that I honestly believe is not a good match for any Paizo product. Otherwise, I’d need to reserve it for Paizo. Also, it has to be based only on products already available to the general public or that a special accommodation was made for. (The existing RGG Starfinder-compatible products were written using advance materials Paizo made available to numerous third-party publishers—RGG included—otherwise RGG couldn’t have even begun work on Starfinder-compatible material until today).

That’s a fairly narrow path to walk, and I take the good-faith parts of it seriously. I’m pretty well the only person who knows what goes on in my head, but that just means I have to hold myself to the highest standard for this. My mental firewalls must err on the side of saving the best ideas for the company paying me specifically to guide rules design for the game, so anything that shows up here is going to be something built off a third-party-publisher’s rules, or too weird to wrongly themed for the official campaign setting, or entirely experimental.

Once place I think there’s some interesting design space is updating magic items and options from the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game to the Starfinder Roleplaying game. There are lots of ways to do that, and some of them aren’t the right tone for what the official campaign setting is shooting for. As an example of something I’m comfortable publishing myself, let’s look at the thing I call the “Weasel Gun.”

Pistol of Tricks

Name  Level  Price   Range Capacity Usage          Bulk    Special

Minor Gray     1          300 credits      20        1          L          (tiny weasel)

Standard Gray 3          1.5k credits     20        1          L          (tiny bat, rat, or weasel)

Major Gray     5          3k credits        20        1          L          (tiny bat, rat, squid, or weasel)

Minor Rust     7          7k credits        40        2          L          (small wolverine)

Standard Rust 9          14k credits      40        2          L          (medium boar, small eagle or wolverine)

Major Rust      11        25k credits      40        2          L          (medium boar, small eagle, octopus, or wolverine)

Minor Tan       13        45k credits      100      10        L          (medium bear or large rhino)

Standard Tan  15        90k credits      100      10        L          (medium bear or vulture, or large rhino)

Major Tan       17        180k credits    100      10        L          (medium bear, shark, or vulture, or large orca, rhino, or roc)

Pistol of Tricks Description

Pistols of tricks are magic uncategorized small arms that summon “trick monsters,” magic constructs that are designed to emulate the appearance and actions of animals. When fired, the magic device converts the energy of its battery into a temporary kinetic manifestation. These “trick monsters” attack whatever they are closest to when summoned. If you successfully hit a creature’s EAC when you fire, that creature is the exclusive target of the trick monster (even once the creature is dead or dying), and the trick monster seeks that creature out if it moves or hides. On a miss the trick monster scatters as a thrown weapon, and attacks the creature nearest to it when it arrives (determine randomly if it is equally close to multiple creatures).

Trick monsters remain for 1 round, plus 1 round per 2 levels of the pistol of tricks that summoned them. It attacks at the end of your turn each round, and can flank or move but doesn’t make combat maneuvers or tack actions other than melee attacks and movement. A pistol of tricks can normally only maintain a single trick monster at a time, so firing a second time ends any previously summoned trick monsters. On a critical hit, the pistol of tricks actually summons two trick monsters of the same type, that attack the same target.

Each pistol of tricks lists which trick monsters it can summon and the size of each. Trick monsters can be targeted by anything that can target an animal or magical construct. You select from the available trick monsters with each attack. The trick monster summoned by a pistol of tricks has game stats based on the level of the weapon used to summon it, as follows:
BAB: Level    Melee damage: 1d6/2 levels (minimum 1d3)

EAC: 9 + level           KAC: 11+ level          Saving Throws: ½ Level

Move: 30 feet + level*           HP: 5 x level  Perception: Level

*Additional movement only counts in +5 ft. increments. So a trick monster goes from 30 to a 35 ft. move when fired from a 5th level weapon, to 40 ft. when fired from a 10th level pistol, and so on. Terrestrial creature have a land speed, flying creatures a fly speed with average movement, and aquatic creatures a swim speed.

Thus the trick weasel of the 1st level Least Gray Pistol of tricks (the iconic “Weasel Gun”) is:
Size Tiny
BAB: +1         Melee Damage: 1d3
EAC: 10         KAC: 11         Saving Throws: +0
Move: 30 Feet            HP:Perception: +1

There are lots of other magic items that get weird and interesting if you consider updating them to a high-tech science-fantasy campaign world. Is a belt of dwarvenkind now an ancient relic, and is there a belt of veskkind to go with it? Should there be a spacesuit of useful items? Eyes of the star eagle?

Patreon

I have a patreon, and it supports these posts. And I thought a belt of vesk-kind sounds cool, so i wrote one up and posted it there for my patrons.

Check it out!

Gen Con Schedule

I’ll be at Gen Con! Here’s what my schedule looks light right now.

WEDNESDAY

I come in before noon. I have a few informal things planned, but you might be able to catch me someplace (like the Omni hotel lobby) if you want to.

THURSDAY

I’m open most of the day! I might try to Meet and greet hour someplace, if folks express interest (and yes, that would be a good time to have me sign stuff).

I mysterious disappear around 7pm, and likely for the rest of the night.

FRIDAY

I’m on several seminar panels!

Starfinder 101

11am   Location: ICC room 212

Introduction to the new Starfinder RPG. Learn the story of the Starfinder universe, what you need to start playing, & where to begin your own character’s legend.

Starfinder Rules Q&A

12pm   Location: ICC room 212

An up-close look at the rules of Starfinder, including differences between the Starfinder & Pathfinder rules. Ask questions & discuss the philosophy behind the Starfinder game system.

ENnies  (6pm)

I’ll be at the ENnie Awards! A great time to meet a lot of your favorite game designers, especially those with products up for awards!

SATURDAY

More seminars!

Starfinder Rules Design workshop

10am   Location: ICC room 212

Participate in a hands-on workshop focused on rules design in the Starfinder universe & assist in developing original rules from concept to execution.

Designing Starfinder Aliens

12pm   Location: ICC room 212

Learn the secrets of monster making & everything that goes into creating a truly terrifying foe.

Secrets of the Pact Worlds

1pm     Location: ICC room 212

Come explore the inner region of space in the Starfinder universe. Learn about Absalom Station & discover alien species.

Starfinder – The Digital Tools Horizon

2pm     Location: Crowne Plaza Victoria Stn B

What does the digital destiny of Starfinder look like? Leading companies answer your questions & outline their visions of the future!

I mysteriously disappear again in the evening. 😀

SUNDAY

Currently wide open!

This is the OTHER day I might schedule an open meet-and-greet, if there was interest.

MONDAY

I fly out in the afternoon, and I suspect I’ll watch the Moon eat the Sun from the airport.

Old School Freelance

I used to send type-written article proposals to Dragon Magazine via US Postal Service, with a S.A.S.E. (That’s a Self-Addressed Stamped Envelope, for those of you who weren’t trying to get published in the 80s and 90s.)

Then I’d wait 4-6 weeks for a response. If there were things he’d like to see some different version of, I had to send ANOTHER written physical piece of mail. If something was approved, or approved with changes, I had to type that out, then mail in the typed article.

When then-Editor of Dragon Dave Gross sent me an email address (sent my US post) I could use to send in magazine proposals and submissions from that point on (with orders it Not Be Shared), around about my third article, it was a HUGE boost to my career. But I began with paper submissions.

By the time I was interviewed for a job at Wizards of the Coast, I could bring files with me on a 3.5″ floppy, in case I stayed someplace with a business center that had a computer I could work on. (A laptop, though they existed, was entirely outside my economic grasp.) So when I was flown out for a in-person interview, I managed to finish a Dragon article between when I left home and when I arrived at the old WotC building to wait an hour or so for my interview, so when a Dragon editor ran down and asked if I knew when the article would be ready, and I gave him the disk, he hugged me and ran back upstairs to begin editing it immediately.

Of course, that meant the people who were about to decide if they wanted to hire me heard about how I brought a much-needed article with me, just before my interview.

Paper. Stamps. Email. Floppy disks. It could be done before filesharing and blogs and Google Docs.

(Looks around. Nods once. Trundles back to dinosaur cave.)

The Modern Era

Now, I can offer material directly to the end-users, with things like My Patreon!

Check it out!

Rats, Wereratrats!

Adventure idea: A community of unusually short-tailed, round-headed ratfolk (an ethnicity called ‘voles’ by other local races) who live in borrows (boroughs?) outside a major city have begun to be assaulted and driven out of local markets by rougher citizens of the city. The settlers accuse the ratfolk of theft, and desecration of several shrines within the city, saying the ratfolk move through the city’s sewers and drains, and have even been seen trying to get at children asleep in their homes.

The ratfolk proclaim their innocence, and point out they warned the city’s leaders weeks ago that wererats had been spotted in the thick brush of a nearby woods. The ratfolk believe the wererats have infected some city dwellers. The city government thinks the ratfolk are making false claims about wererats to protect some ratfolk hooligans, and thus aren’t taking it seriously.

Thus the ratfolk need help, because the wererats (who do indeed walk among them, including a few wererat ratfolk who only have a modest appearance change in hybrid form) are a demon cult who wish to summon agents of their demonic patron, a scavenger lord who spreads disease and uses vrocks as his agents. The wererats have summoned one vrock already, and want two more so they can do a dance of ruin beneath the city streets! So, the rastfolk want to hire some outsiders (the PCs) to fairly investigate.

The players must separate fact from fiction, deal with hunting down were rats both in the city sewers and hiding in plain site among the ratfllk, and ultimately deal with the apocalyptic whereat demon cult’s plans.

The name of the adventure?

“Vrock and Vole”

Rarer Than Astronauts?

Full-time, on-staff tabletop/pen-and-paper RPG writers with benefits are incredibly rare in the US.

I was told in 2000 there were more full-time astronauts in the US (149 at the time) than full-time, on-staff RPG writers. I suspect that was true at the time. There are fewer US astronauts now, and a lot more small companies with 1 or 2 people running it as full-time jobs, so whether it’s true now is going to depend on how you define things.

Getting on-staff at a game company as a creative of any kind (designer, developer, R&D, writer… titles vary by company) requires you to have a proven track record and a reputation for being someone that is easy to work with. In my opinion, nowadays the easiest way to get those started is by writing things for social media (one of the reasons I have a blog, for example), then work cheaply for small game companies, often for pdf-only or print-in-demand products. Hopefully you’ll get better, get more work, and come to more people’s attention. As your network of contacts spread and more people know about you, the size of company that is interested in working with you goes up.

The leap from that to an on-staff position is still a big one. I worked for Wizards of the Coast from 2000 to 2001, then was a full-time freelancer for most of the next 13 years before I got another staff job here at Paizo. You may have better luck than I did, or you may want to start your own publishing company, or begin a Patreon, or just do freelance work for several different companies, many of them smaller than Paizo.

Good luck to everyone who tries!

Hit or Myth

I often play with new mythologies when writing up new campaign worlds, and some work out better than others. When making new mythologies, I like to remember that real-world mythology is often much, much weirder and more primal than the neat pantheons we often get in RPGs.

It’s a fantasy world. Have fun with it. And\ example:

“Think you that first came gods in man-form, in the shape of elf or dwarf was born divinity? Now, all these gods are but recent tribes, attested by those who build shrines to the power that look onto them.

Before the god tribes were the Hrimthur, the storm gods, and the Svadilfar, the horse gods. The Hrimthur sought to freeze or drown or shatter with wind and lightning all living things, and of all the first animals, it was the noble horse gods, the Svadilfar, who put the Hrimthur in check. Long were their battles, but in time the Hrumthur were driven back to the mountains and oceans, from where to this day their make their assaults in the storm seasons.

The Svadilfar sought to heal the world damaged by their battles, and the eldest and wisest of them, the mare Sleinyrsa, saw among the animals two that were more clever. She selected them, the female Freafar and her mate the male Wojanan, to aid in rebuilding the world. They were allowed to ride on Sleinyrsa herself, and thus became gods, and selectors of dead animals to also ride upon the Svadilfar. And this god riders became the tribes of tool-using gods, second only to the Svadilfar, and kin to the Raven King gods, who also learned of tools.

And from these tribes later come all the gods of elf, and gnome, and dwarf, and man.”

“Oh R’lyeh?!”

I had always wondered what the HELL could cause Cthulhu* to give so much side-eye.
Cthulhu Side Eye
I now believe he had read the commends section of the Necronomicon.

“The layout of R’lyeh is so bad it’s hard not to conclude it was intentionally designed to inconvenience visitors.”

“A single read-through and I have already found five runes that would cause you to be ripped apart in the streets by invisible spirits. I am disappointed, as I (very reasonably) expected better editing from my favorite Elder God. No effort went into this.”

“I know Cthulhu may be uncomfortable discussing how chubby his tentacles are getting, but as a fan I feel I have to make sure he understands how dangerous that is for his health.”

(With much love to artist Erol Otus, and the original 1st Edition Deities and Demigods.)

Return of the Illusionist/Thief!

There aren’t a lot of classic “old school” multiclass combinations left I haven’t addressed, having done the anruth (an old school druidic bard), cavalier-paladincleric/assassincleric/fighter/thief, cleric/rangerfighter/magic-user/thiefthief-acrobat, as well as randomly acquired psionics, and even the fighter/illusionist at my patreon. At least—there aren’t a lot left I think actually need any help to be used in Pathfinder. There are good ways to create characters filling the roles of the cleric/fighter (warpriest, inquisitor), cleric/magic user (Rogue Genius Games’ magister class), fighter/magic-user (magus), fighter/thief (just do a multiclass fighter/rogue), fighter/assassin (a fighter/rogue can take the assassin prestige class, or you can just play a slayer), and magic-user/thief (the eldritch scoundrel rogue archetype).

But there is still at least one I think would be tricky to build in a satisfying way in Pathfinder—the illusionist/thief. Being an illusionist has specific keynotes in Pathfinder, and it’s hard to hit those with any class with good rogue ability without losing significant effectiveness.

So, taking notes from the unchained rogue, the eldritch scoundrel, the arcanist, and my own fighter/illusionist, here’s a hybrid class for the illusionist/thief.

The Illusionist/Thief

Alignment: Any

Hit Die: d8

Starting Wealth: 5d6 × 10 gp (average 140 gp.) In addition, each character begins play with an outfit worth 10 gp or less.

Class Skills

The illusionist/thief’s’s class skills are Acrobatics (Dex), Appraise (Int), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Disable Device (Dex), Disguise (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (dungeoneering) (Int), Knowledge (local) (Int), Linguistics (Int), Perception (Wis), Perform (Cha), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Sleight of Hand (Dex), Spellcraft (Int), Stealth (Dex), Swim (Str), and Use Magic Device (Cha).

Skill Ranks per Level: 6 + Int modifier.

Table: Illusionist/Thief

Level  Base Attack Bonus    Fort Save        Ref Save         Will Save        Special

1st       +0        +0        +2        +0        Finesse training, sneak attack +1, trapfinding

2nd      +1        +0        +3        +0        Rogue talent

3rd       +2        +1        +3        +1        Finesse training, sneak attack +1d6

4th       +3        +1        +4        +1        Debilitating injury, rogue talent, uncanny dodge

5th       +3        +1        +4        +1        Sneak attack +2d4

6th       +4        +2        +5        +2        Rogue talent

7th       +5        +2        +5        +2        Sneak attack +2d6

8th       +6/+1  +2        +6        +2        Rogue talent

9th       +6/+1  +3        +6        +3        Sneak attack +3d6

10th     +7/+2  +3        +7        +3        Advanced talents, rogue talent

11th     +8/+3  +3        +7        +3        Finesse training, sneak attack +4d6

12th     +9/+4  +4        +8        +4        Rogue talent

13th     +9/+4  +4        +8        +4        Sneak attack +5d6

14th     +10/+5 +4        +9        +4        Rogue talent

15th     +11/+6/+1       +5        +9        +5        Sneak attack +6d6

16th     +12/+7/+2       +5        +10      +5        Rogue talent

17th     +12/+7/+2       +5        +10      +5        Sneak attack +7d6

18th     +13/+8/+3       +6        +11      +6        Rogue talent

19th     +14/+9/+4       +6        +11      +6        Finesse training, sneak attack +8d6

20th     +15/+10/+5     +6        +12      +6        Master caster, rogue talent

Class Features

The following are the class features of the illusionist/thief.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Illusionist thieves are proficient with all simple weapons, plus the hand crossbow, rapier, sap, short sword, and shortbow. They are proficient with cloth light armor (but no armor with a significant amount of metal or leather), but not with shields. Their illusionist/thief spells suffer no ASF when they wear light armor composed primarily of cloth.

Favored Class Bonuses

A character that takes a level of illusionist/thief as a favored class can select any favored class bonus the character would receive as a rogue or a wizard, as long as the selected favored class bonus does not grant or modify a class feature the illusionist/thief lacks.

Spellcasting and Illusions

An illusionist/thief has access to a broad range of magic, but can only cast a very few spells per day. This requires her to depend on her skills and talents for much of her adventuring effectiveness, while giving her the option to use spells when a situation becomes dire or when she can find some long-term synergy to deal with a problem.

At 1st level the illusionist/thief casts spells drawn from the bard class list (though she cannot cast any spell that requires or modifies a class feature she does not have, such as bardic performance), and all wizard illusions spells. The illusionist/thief gains the arcane school wizard class feature (including being able to prepare one additional spell of the specialized school for each spell level she can cast), but may only select the illusion school (or its associated focused schools) to specialize in, and automatically has evocation as its opposed school (but does not have to select a second opposed school). The illusionist/thief uses her illusionist/thief level as her wizard level for the illusion arcane school abilities.

An illusionist/thief can prepare a number of spells per day as a magus of her level, and uses Charisma to determine her bonus spells, maximum spell level she can learn or prepare,

To learn, prepare, or cast a spell, the illusionist/thief must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell’s level. The saving throw DC against an illusionist/thief’s spell is 10 + the spell’s level + the illusionist/thief’s Intelligence modifier.

An illusionist/thief can only cast a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. Her base daily spell allotment is given on Table: Illusionist/thief under “Spells per Day.” In addition, she receives bonus spells per day if she has a high Charisma score.

An illusionist/thief may know any number of spells, but the number she can prepare each day is limited. At 1st level, she can prepare four 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells each day. At each new illusionist/thief level, the number of spells she can prepare each day increases, adding new spell levels (using the same chart as the spells per day of the magus). Unlike the number of spells she can cast per day, the number of spells an arcanist can prepare each day is not affected by her Charisma score. Feats and other effects that modify the number of spells known by a spellcaster instead affect the number of spells an illusionist/thief can prepare.

An illusionist/thief must choose and prepare her spells ahead of time by getting 8 hours of sleep and spending 1 hour studying her spellbook. While studying, the illusionist/thief decides what spells to prepare and refreshes her available spell slots for the day.

Like a sorcerer, an illusionist/thief can choose to apply any metamagic feats she knows to a prepared spell as she casts it, with the same increase in casting time (see Spontaneous Casting and Metamagic Feats). However, she may also prepare a spell with any metamagic feats she knows and cast it without increasing casting time like a wizard. She cannot combine these options—a spell prepared with metamagic feats cannot be further modified with another metamagic feat at the time of casting.

Table: Illusionist/thief Spells Per Day

Class               Spell Level

Level   1          2          3          4          5          6

1          1          –           –           –           –           –

2          1          –           –           –           –           –

3          1          –           –           –           –           –

4          2          1          –           –           –           –

5          2          1          –           –           –           –

6          2          1          –           –           –           –

7          3          2          1          –           –           –

8          3          2          1          –           –           –

9          3          2          1          –           –           –

10        3          3          2          1          –           –

11        3          3          2          1          –           –

12        3          3          2          1          –           –

13        3          3          3          1          1          –

14        3          3          3          1          1          –

15        3          3          3          1          1          –

16        3          3          3          2          1          1

17        3          3          3          2          1          1

18        3          3          3          2          1          1

19        3          3          3          2          2          1

20        3          3          3          2          2          1

Sneak Attack

If an illusionist/thief can catch an opponent when he is unable to defend himself effectively from her attack, she can strike a vital spot for extra damage.

The illusionist/thief’s attack deals extra damage anytime her target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to AC (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the illusionist/thief flanks her target, or when the illusionist/thief has convinced the target she is something other than an armed humanoid (normally with an illusion)—in which case the illusion ends with the first sneak attack. This extra damage is +1 point at 1st level, 1d6 at 3rd level, 2d4 at 5th level, 2d6 at 7th level, and increases by 1d6 every 2 illusionist/thief levels thereafter. Ranged attacks can count as sneak attacks only if the target is within 30 feet. This additional damage is precision damage and is not multiplied on a critical hit.

With a weapon that deals nonlethal damage (such as a sap, unarmed strike, or whip), a illusionist/thief can make a sneak attack that deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage. She cannot use a weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage in a sneak attack—not even with the usual –4 penalty.

The illusionist/thief must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. A illusionist/thief cannot sneak attack while striking a creature with total concealment.

Trapfinding

An illusionist/thief adds 1/3 her level on Perception checks to locate traps and on Disable Device checks (minimum +1). An illusionist/thief can use Disable Device to disarm magic traps.

Finesse Training (Ex)

At 1st level, an illusionist/thief gains Weapon Finesse as a bonus feat. In addition, starting at 3rd level, she can select any one type of weapon that can be used with Weapon Finesse (such as rapiers or daggers). Once this choice is made, it cannot be changed. Whenever she makes a successful melee attack with the selected weapon, she adds her Dexterity modifier instead of her Strength modifier to the damage roll. If any effect would prevent the illusionist/thief from adding her Strength modifier to the damage roll, she does not add her Dexterity modifier. The illusionist/thief can select a second weapon at 11th level and a third at 19th level.

Rogue Talents

As an illusionist/thief gains experience, she learns a number of talents that aid her and confound her foes. Starting at 2nd level, an illusionist/thief gains one unchained rogue talent. She gains an additional rogue talent for every 2 levels attained after 2nd level. An illusionist/thief cannot select an individual talent more than once. She may select evasion (as the rogue lass feature) as a talent and, if she does, may select improved evasion as a talent beginning at 8th level. She may also select uncanny dodge as a talent and if she does, may select improved uncanny dodge as a talent beginning at 8th level.

Talents marked with an asterisk add effects to an illusionist/thief’s sneak attack. Only one of these talents can be applied to an individual attack, and the decision must be made before the attack roll is made.

Debilitating Injury (Ex)

At 4th level, whenever an illusionist/thief deals sneak attack damage to a foe, she can also debilitate the target of her attack, causing it to take a penalty for 1 round (this is in addition to any penalty caused by a rogue talent or other special ability). The illusionist/thief can choose to apply any one of the following penalties when the damage is dealt.

Befuddled: The target becomes befuddled, taking a –2 penalty to saving throws against illusions and to Perception checks, and being considered distracted for purposes of creatures being able to make Stealth checks against it. The target takes an additional –2 penalty to saving throws against illusions cast by the illusionist/thief and to Perception checks regarding the illusionist/thief. At 10th level and 16th level, the penalties increase by –2 (to a total maximum of –8).

Disoriented: The target takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls. In addition, the target takes an additional –2 penalty on all attack rolls it makes against the illusionist/thief. At 10th level and 16th level, the penalty on attack rolls made against the illusionist thief increases by –2 (to a total maximum of –8).

Hampered: All of the target’s speeds are reduced by half (to a minimum of 5 feet). In addition, the target cannot take a 5-foot step.

These penalties do not stack with themselves, but additional attacks that deal sneak attack damage extend the duration by 1 round. A creature cannot suffer from more than one penalty from this ability at a time. If a new penalty is applied, the old penalty immediately ends. Any form of healing applied to a target suffering from one of these penalties also removes the penalty.

Advanced Talents

At 10th level and every 2 levels thereafter, an illusionist/thief can choose an unchained rogue advanced talents in place of a rogue talent.

Master Caster (Ex)

At 20th level, once per round an illusionist/thief can combine the casting of a spell with a casting time of 1 standard action or less with a sneak attack. The spell affects only the target of the sneak attack, the number of sneak attack dice done is reduced by the level of the spell cast, and the spell does not provoke an attack of opportunity. If the spell has a range of touch, the attack roll for the sneak attack counts as the touch attack roll.

If I May Steal a Moment of Your Time.

I have a Patreon. I even posted two illusionist/thief talents there, as bonus content, currently exclusively for patrons.

Check it out!

The Gamer

On a warm summer’s eve
On a team bound for nowhere
I met up with the gamer
We were both too tired to sleep

So we took turns a-starin’
At the window with the forums
The boredom overtook us,
And he began to speak

He said, “Son, I’ve made a life
Out of readin’ GM’s faces
Knowin’ which big monsters
Had caught their beady eyes

So if you don’t mind me sayin’
I can see you’re out of d6s
For a sip of some Jolt cola
I’ll give you some advice”

So I handed him my bottle
And he drank down my last swallow
He pulled out a tablet
With a screen with a backlight

And the night got deathly quiet
And his faced lost all expression
He said, “If you’re gonna play the game, boy
You gotta learn to play it right

You’ve got to know what’s your THACO
Know who to whack-o
Know when to fireball
Or to pull a gun
You never count your gp
When you’re still in an encounter
There’ll be time enough for countin’
When the dungeon’s done.

(With apologies to Kenny Rogers)