The Value of Spellcasting

I have often wondered how valuable players and GMs find spellcasting. For example if you place limitations and degradations on spellcasting and boost the cost of acquiring it, at what point does it become not worth the effort? How close is that to the point when most GMs are comfortable allowing spellcasting easily-acquired outside of a class into a campaign?

This leads to a though experiment of a feat.

Spellcasting (Thought Experiment)

You can cast spells. Just not very well.

Benefit: Select one class’s spellcasting list. If that class has alignment, code, equipment requirements that must to be able to cast spells (such as a paladin’s code, or a druid’s need to be partially neutral and avoid metal armor), you must meet those requirements or suffer the same consequences with regards to spells gained through this feat) as the class you selected.

You gain spells known and spells per day as spell-like abilities from that spell list, using the spells known and spells per day of a 1st level sorcerer and your character level as your caster level. To determine your save DCs and max spell known, instead of Charisma or the ability score used by the class you picked for the spell list, you use your lowest ability score. You can change one spell known at every character level, using the rules for sorcerers to swap spells known, but they must all come from the selected spell list.

Special: You can take this feat more than once, but not more times than 1+1/2 your character level. Each time, you increase your effective sorcerer level for determining your spells known and spells per day from the selected spell list by +2, and increase the number of spells you can swap out at each new level by +1.

Patreon (Not a thought experiment)

As always, this post is supported by my patrons, and you could join them!

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About okcstephens

Owen K.C. Stephens Owen Kirker Clifford Stephens is the Starfinder Design Lead for Paizo Publishing, the Freeport and Pathfinder RPG developer for Green Ronin, a developer for Rite Publishing, and the publisher and lead genius of Rogue Genius Games. Owen has written game material for numerous other companies, including Wizards of the Coast, Kobold Press, White Wolf, Steve Jackson Games and Upper Deck. He also consults, freelances, and in the off season, sleeps.

Posted on December 20, 2017, in Game Design, Pathfinder Development and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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