Author Archives: okcstephens

The Torchbearer Archetype for the 5e Mascot Class

Monday we laid out the concept and framework for the Mascot class for 5e, Tuesday we presented the Domestic Companion option for that class, and Wednesday we presenting the Inspiring Failure class feature.

So, it’s time to present our other initial archetype, the Torchbearer.

Mascot Archetype
At 1st level, you choose an archetype that defines what kind of mascot you are, and gives you some idea how other PCs and NPCs are likely to see and treat your character. You can choose from the Domestic Creature or Torchbearer archetypes.

The archetype you choose grants you features at 1st level and again at 7th, 10th, 15th, and 18th level.

5e Torchbearer
(art by Zdenek Sasek)

Torchbearer
You are a dedicated assistant to adventurers and heroes. You may not actually carry a torch of course — you might be a young squire with a mace, a farmer with a pitchfork, or a hireling with more loyalty than your employers know. You don’t think of yourself as a hero, but you will aid them however you can. You spend a great deal of time carrying torches to light their way, bringing them lost weapons, and standing beside them in the darkest moments so they do not have to face such risks alone.

A Light In The Darkness
Beginning when you take this archetype at 1st level, your plucky courage and willingness to take the same risks as your allies moves them to be their very best. This ability, and all your other torchbearer abilities, only function after a round when you do not make an attack or cast a spell. If you take either of those actions, no torchbearer ability functions until after the beginning of your next turn.
When an ally within 30 feet makes an attack roll or saving throw, you may choose to roll 1d20 as well. If your result is better than the ally’s (or both of the ally’s, if they have advantage), they make take your d20 rather than use their own die results. Once an ally chooses to use your d20 result, you cannot use this ability again until after the end of your next turn.

How Dare!
You friends are offended when enemies harm you. At 7th level, if a foe successfully hits you with an attack, or forces you to make a saving throw you fail, one ally of your choice within 60 feet gains advantage on their next attack against that foe. Only one ally can have this benefit at a time, and it must be used within 2 rounds.

Over My Dead Body
At 10th level when you are adjacent to an ally, and an enemy targets that ally (with an attack or a spell or effect that selects targets rather than an area), you can use your reaction to cause the attack or effect to target you instead. The effect otherwise works normally (requiring attack rolls to hit or allowing saving throws as appropriate), just with you rather than your ally as the target.

It’s Good To Have Friends
Those who harm you find your allies wroth. At 15th level when an ally attacks a foe that has within the past day damaged you, or created an effect or cast a spell you failed a saving throw against, and the attack is a success you can use your reaction to make it a critical success instead.

Don’t Be Dead
So great is your grief at seeing the fall of the heroes you have spent your life helping, the universe itself responds by keeping them just at the brink of death’s door. As an action you can attend an adjacent ally who died within 1 minute as a result of massive damage or from failing a third death save. The ally turns out to have never quite died, regains a number of hit points equal to your level (or half it’s maximum, whichever is less), and becomes conscious. Once you use this ability, you cannot do so again until you take a long rest.

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Inspiring Failure for the 5e Mascot Class

Monday we laid out the concept and framework for the Mascot class for 5e, and Tuesday we presented the Domestic Companion option for the Mascot Archetype class feature. We’ll present the Torchbearer archetype later in the week, but today I actually want to define the Inspiring Failure class feature.

While a Mascot character is often out of their element and overmatched by the circumstances of adventuring, the very fact they keep trying can inspire their allies. When a mascot succeeds at a task everyone is delighted, even their failures can inspire the heroes around them to achieve greater success on the mascot’s behalf.

Mascot Maid
(art by Lunstream)

Inspiring Failure

You get one use of Inspiring Failure at 3rd level, and gain an additional use at 11th, 17th, and 20th level.

The first time each day you fail an attack roll, Ability/Skill check, or saving throw while you are in an encounter that can earn XP (as determined by the GM), you earn one inspiring failure point (IFP). When an ally within 60 feet who witnessed your failure fails an attack, ability/skill, or save, you may expend an IFP to grant them a special reroll. If the d20 on their reroll results in a 1-10, they gain a +10 bonus to their total.

Each additional use you gain of inspiring failure allows you to gain an IFP from an additional failed roll on your point. When you take a long rest, you lose all IFP.

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Mascot Class Archetypes, for 5e

Yesterday we laid out the concept and framework for the Mascot class for 5e, so now it’s time to begin deliver into some specifics.

At 1st level you choose a Mascot Archetype. This defines what KIND of mascot you are, and will impact your character’s options and play style as you gain more levels. In a full version of this class we’d likely want at least 3 Mascot Archetypes, but for blog posts I think we can just do two. (If there’s a huge demand for more, we can always circle back ‘around to it. 🙂 )

We’ll start with the Domestic Creature.

Mascot Chow Chow
(Art by Kajenna)

Mascot Archetype
At 1st level, you choose an archetype that defines what kind of mascot you are, and gives you some idea how other PCs and NPCs are likely to see and treat your character. You can choose from the Domestic Creature or Torchbearer archetypes.

The archetype you choose grants you features at 1st level and again at 7th, 10th, 15th, and 18th level.

Domestic Creature
Regardless of what species you choose (human, elf, dwarf, and so-on), you are actually a Small or Tiny creature that appears to be a pet or companion. You may be a common pert, such as a cat or dog, or may be a more supernatural kind of noncombat companion. You have lived with the species you took for your character enough that you count as them for purposes of spells and prerequisites (and get all the appropriate traits), but are truly some different kind of creature.

Beginning at first level when you take this archetype you are treated as one size smaller, can only express concepts as long as five words, look like a domestic pet of some kind, and can only use one hand worth of equipment (held in your mouth, or talons, or flippers as appropriate). A creature of your size or larger can carry you in 1 arm (if you are willing) without worrying about your weight. A creature at least 2 sizes larger than you can carry you in a pocket with ease.

You also gain two of the following of your choice, as part of your domestic creature nature — darkvision, a 20 foot fly speed (but you cannot carry anyone unless they are smaller than you), 1 30 foot fly speed, the ability to breath on land and in water, a finesse attack that does 1d4 + Strength damage and does bludgeoning,slashing, or peircing damage (your choice), advantage on one category of saves of your choice, advantage on one of the following skills of your choice — Acrobatics, Animal Handling, Athletics, Insight, Perception, or Stealth.

Cat Witch

Domestic Creature Advances
At 7th level, and again at 10th, 15th, and 18th, you select one of the advances listed below. You cannot select a greater version of an advance until you have selected the standard version.

Cute Creature: As a bonus action when an ally adjacent to you makes a Charisma (Deception, Performance, or Persuasion) check, you grant them advantage.

Cute Creature, Greater: You can be so cute, creatures are stupified by how adorable you are. this acts as hypnotic pattern, but affects only one creature.

Distracting Creature: As an action you can make an attack or Charisma (Intimidate) check against a target within 30 feet. If successful rather than your normal effect, the target suffers disadvantage on all attacks for 1 round, and anyone that is forced to make a saving throw against your targets spells or effects during that round gain advantage on the save.

Distracting Creature, Greater: You can use distracting creature against all foes within a 10-foot cube at a range of 60 feet.

Guard Creature: You take no penalties to Perception when asleep, and if you successfully perceive a threat you can wake all allies within 60 feet as a bonus action. As a bonus action when an ally adjacent to you makes a Wisdom (Perception) check, you grant them advantage.

Guard Creature, Greater: As a bonus action when an ally adjacent to you is attacked, you give the attack disadvantage.

Support Creature: As a bonus action when an ally adjacent to you makes a Wisdom or Charisma saving throw, you give the save advantage.

Support Creature: You can cast calm emotions at will.

We’ll look at our other archetype, torchbearer, tomorrow!

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The Mascot Class, for 5e

There’s a character that shows up fairly often in fantasy fiction, that is rarely taken as a player concept in RPGs. This is the brave hireling who tries to defend you with a cooking pot, the gardener and family friend who carries you when your legs give out, the faithful tutor who takes an assassin’s dagger so you can defeat the villain.

They aren’t mages, or warriors, or treasure acquisition experts. They are commoners or civilians, who love the heroes enough to go with them, and are often described as the “heart” of the group… because “hanger-on and potential hostage” doesn’t sound as complimentary.

Basically, they are adventuring group mascots. They DO make appearances as NPCs in some games, and I have seen GMs do great jobs with them. But I also know a lot of players who would LOVE to roleplay the team mascot… as long as they could still DO something.

And I think it’s possible to build a class that gives a player game options that are fun, while still preserving the “civilian” nature of a mascot.

I think this idea works REALLY well for 5e, so I am using that for my framework. We’ll need to start with some basics.

ErgaTheMagnanimous-color-01
(Art by Jacob Blackmon)

Mascot Class Features
As a mascot, you gain the following class features.

Hit Points
Hit Dice: 1d6 per mascot level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 12 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d12 (or 8) + your Constitution modifier per mascot level after 1st

Proficiencies
Armor: Shields
Weapons: Simple weapons
Tools: Pick any four
Saving Throws: Wisdom, Constitution
Skills: Choose two skills from Animal Handling, Insight, Investigation, Medicine, Perception, Survival, and Religion

Equipment
You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:
(a) a simple weapon and a shield or two simple weapons
(a) Two tools you are proficient with
(a) a dungeoneer’s pack or (b) an explorer’s pack

Table: The Mascot
Level Proficiency Bonus Bonus Features
1st +2 Mascot Archetype
2nd +2 Shtick
3rd +2 Inspiring failure (one use)
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement
5th +3 Schick
6th +3 Ability Score Improvement
7th +3 Mascot Archetype feature
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement
9th +4 Schick
10th +4 Mascot Archetype feature
11th +4 Inspiring failure (two uses)
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement
13th +5 Shtick
14th +5 Ability Score Improvement
15th +5 Mascot Archetype feature
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement
17th +6 Inspiring failure (three uses)
18th +6 Mascot Archetype feature
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement
20th +6 Inspiring failure (four uses)

Okay with that we can begin to build out the game options. So, what are the mascot archetypes?! What shticks can you pick from?! How does FAILURE inspire?

Come back over the course of the week, and we’ll investigate these intriguing options.

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If the RPG Industry is So Terrible, Why Do I Do This?

Dice(Image by Jessica Dale)

For about a month now, I’ve been talking about the realities of the U.S. tabletop RPG industry, as I see them. I’ve posted thoughts on Facebook and Twitter, including under the hashtags #RealGameIndustry and #NotesFromAnRPGDev. ENWorld also created threads to discuss many of these shortly after I started, and again a week or so later. (And, I just discovered, a third time on July 4th).

And a lot of those observations paint a pretty grim picture. Poor pay. No security. No prospects for retirement. Regular harassment from fans and pop culture commentators. A fairly wide spectrum of people who think what you do requires no special talents, and that’s why you can’t make a living at it, and if you wanted to be able to live in moderate safety you shouldn’t picked a “fun” job like making games. These, of course, are intermixed with people who feel the need to interject about how common these problems are in all industries–which certainly suggests picking a different career might not be as helpful as the first group wants to claim.

Of course, my experiences aren’t objective or somehow universal of course, but I have been involved in the industry for 23 years, as a freelance writer (full and part time), contract worker, staff designer, staff developer, freelance developer, producer, line editor, publisher, and consultant. But even then, it’s one narrow slice of the ttRPG industry. A number of other professionals have opined about what they agree with, and what they feel like need qualifiers, but there’s been little real disagreement that I have seen.

So, if it’s a terrible way to make a living—why do I? Why stick with an industry for decades if even the “success” of getting hired on-staff by the two biggest RPG companies in North America isn’t enough to leave me able to pay the bills without having to scramble every month?

I was writing the headline of this article, and my wife leaned over, and in all seriousness asked me “So, why DO you do it?”

I confess that in the past 6 months, I have begun to think maybe I shouldn’t. Maybe it’s time to hang up the dice, at least professionally, and switch to a “normal” job. I still may. But not this week, which brings us back to “why?”

There are two big reasons.

1. I Want To Help

And I think I can, but only from the inside.

So, what do I mean by help?

I mean help gaming, as a hobby, and game professionals, as a group. I want to work to make the ttRPG industry create the most good situations for the most people. That means working to improve conditions and stability, trying new things and seeing if any of them work better, answering questions, tutoring people, putting folks in touch with other folks for mutual benefit, and publicly fighting for diversity, inclusion, and ethical game designs.

And while it may be hubris to think I can make a difference, I’d rather struggle so survive if it means there is a chance I can make other people’s struggles easier. I’ll never be the person who determines if I have succeeded at this, of course. And I may never know if I really improve things. But I do get feedback that convinces me the effort is worth making.

It looks to me like there will be people trying to be full-time RPG professionals for the foreseeable future. I want to help them, and at the same time help the industry, hobby, and fans of gaming be the best they can.

2. I Think RPGs Are Important

I think ALL games are important, but especially ttRPGs. Roleplaying Games brought me most of the good things in my life.

High school was harsh for me, and I can honestly say I was miserable most of the time and considered suicide more than once. But RPGs let me explore ideas I was too afraid to discuss, helped me form a strong social support group, and let me make friends I am still playing with 25 and 30 years later. Nothing else came close to letting me deal with my pain, and learn something about bravery. 

I learned empathy through RPGs, and regret, and problem solving. It encouraged me to learn about history, grammar, math, probability, tactics, risk-taking and analysis, even a theory of fun. I doubt there is any positive aspect of my personality I can’t trace back to RPGs. And a lot of things I know were terrible parts of who I was growing up I overcame through interactions with RPGs, and the people I met through them.

My tightest bonds outside my immediately family came from ttRPGs. I met my wife through roleplaying. My best friends, from people I have known for more than 35 years to people I just got to know in the past year, through roleplaying. I have gotten to learn from geniuses, and help put folks much more creative than me on easier paths, through roleplaying games.

Further, I believe the influence of ttRPGs has much bigger ripples than people realize. And I want to have a small hand in what those ripples look like, and what messages they send out.

So yes, even when some person or persons leaves comments on videos claiming I am so fat and disgusting no-one should ever look at me or trust me, even in weeks when I have to spend 60-70 hours scrambling to pay the bills and arrange for opportunities to do the same thing next month, even when groups of people claim my ethics and morals are just schemes to draw attention, even when people smarter and more creative than me throw in the towel and leave the industry — or maybe especially those times — I feel the drive to keep doing this.

I know I cannot make a huge difference, but I feel this is the tool I can best use to do the most good, for the most people.

If you feel like supporting me in those efforts, you can make a huge difference by supporting my Patreon.

 

The Dynasties of the Fantômonde

In the Fantômonde, there are five Dynasties that represent the five ways a terne may discover the phantom world. Upon accessing the Fantômonde for the first time, a percie is wise to find which Dynasty they used to expand their world. Once a percie knows this, they are referred to as a Scion of that dynasty.

Ankhar epitomize resilience, determination, and perseverance. They are seen as dull or stubborn by many other Scions, but Ankhar don’t give up easily and at the end of a trying time it is the Ankhar most likely to be left standing.

Mahgreis see pain and sadness as the best teachers for both themselves and others. They may be dismissed as broody and unempathic, but they wish to see the world as it truly is, and believe nothing of value is accomplished without sacrifice.

Peraseer are thoughtful, intuitive, and creative. They are sometimes accused by other Scions of being flighty or chaotic, but they are simply more likely to trust their instincts than obvious answers and will take the time they need to explore new thoughts or hunches before being comfortable with a plan.

Valdrakken take to power and violence. Scions of other dynasties often see them as brutish, short-tempered, and bloodthirsty, but when fighting begins most admit you want a Scion of Valdrakken on your side.

Whinnowhin appreciate things that are done right and done well, even thigns that other Scions look down upon. A Whinnowhin may be seen as uncreative or unambitious, but they simply wish things to actually get done, rather than wasting time trying to find fancier ways to accomplish needful tasks.
Not all percies learn their Dynasty. Some think of the traditions defining them as limiting or self-fullfilling prophecies. Others claim to be empowered my multiple Dynasties, despite the seers and mancers declaring that factually this never happens. And a few just don’t get around to it, spending more time focusing on their vocation, or trying to build a veil to remove themselves from the Fantômonde and wishing to renounce all elements of it.

Author’s Note:
I don’t know if I’ll ever touch this again, but it leaped into my head nearly fully-formed, so I wrote it down. If you DO want me to explore these ideas more, obviously the best way to let me know is to join my Patreon and say so! 🙂

Magus Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re wrapping up this week of Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We were focusing on the classes from the COM — we did the biohacker Monday, the vanguard on Tuesday, and the witchwarper on Wednesday. You can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG.

That covers all the official Starfinder classes for now… but goodness knows there are some great Starfinder-compatible classes products by other companies, including my own Rogue Genius Games. We got a request to do the magus legacy class found in the Starfarer’s Companion. So, let’s apply the themetype treatment to that, shall we?

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

SF Magus
(art by Sonsogyeka)

Magus ThemeType
The idea of blending magic and combat has always appealed to you, and while you ultimately followed a different path, you learned enough of the arts of the magi to impact your tactics and options

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): At 1st level you gain a +1 to Intelligence. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level) You gain Mysticism as a class skill. If it is already a class skill, you instead gain a +1 bonus to all Mysgicism checks. You reduce the DC of Mysticism checks to identify magic weapons, fusions, and fusion seals by 5.

Minor Magus Magic (Sp, Archetype, 2nd Level): Select one 1st level magus spell. You can cast this spell once per day. Select two 0-level magus spells. You can cast these spells at will. Your caster level for all magus spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType is equal to your character level, and you use your key ability score for all calculations that normally draw on the magus’s key ability score.

Basic Magus Magic (Sp, Archetype, 4th Level): Select two 1st level magus spells. You have two 1st-level magus spell slots per day you can use for any combination of the 1st-level magus spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType. This replaces the 1st level spell you gained from minor magus. Also select a third 0-level magus spells. You can cast this spell at will.

Basic Spell Combat (Theme, 6th Level) You gain the spell combat class ability for spells from any class, but once you use it you cannot use it again until you expend a Resolve Point to regain Stamina Points following a 10-minute rest.

Minor Magus Arcana (Ex, Archetype, 6th Level) You gain one magus arcana. You treat your magus level as being 2/3 your character level for all arcana gained from this Multiclass ThemeType.

Improved Basic Spell Combat (Theme, 9th Level) When you use spell combat, your spell now does not provoke an attack of opportunity if it’s spell level is no greater than (1/3 your character level) -2.

Basic Arcane Weapon (Theme, 12th Level) You gain the arcane weapons class feature of the magus. You treat your magus level as half your character level.

Advanced Magus Magic (Sp, Archetype, 12th Level): Select one 2nd level magus spells. You can cast this spell once per day.

Full Spell Combat (Theme, 18th Level) There is no no limit to how often you can use spell combat.

Greater Magus Magic (Ex, Archetype, 18th Level) Select one 3rd level magus spell. You may cast this spell once per day.

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Ranger Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re continuing this week with Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We’re focusing on the classes from the COM. We did the biohacker Monday, the vanguard on Tuesday, and the witchwarper on Wednesday. You can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG.

That covers all the official Starfinder classes for now… but goodness knows there are some great Starfinder-compatible classes products by other companies, including my own Rogue Genius Games. Among the most popular of these is the legacy ranger class, which can be found in the Starfarer’s Companion. So, let’s apply the themetype treatment to that, shall we?

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

Ranger ThemeType
You have always been at home in the wilderness. Your work or calling may have prevented you from focusing on your love of nature, but you remain comfortable and competent when you find yourself in the wild.

SF Ranger
(Art by Digital Storm)

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): Pick a ranger style. At 1st level you gain a +1 to the ability score linked to that style. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level) You gain Survival as a class skill. If it is already a class skill, you instead gain a +1 bonus to all Survival checks. You reduce the DC of Survival checks to endure severe weather and orienteering by 5.

Minor Ranger Ways (Ex, Archetype, 2nd Level) Select one ranger class skill. You gain 1 bonus rank in this skill, which cannot exceed your normal maximum skill ranks. You gain an additional bonus skill rank at 4th level, and ever even class level thereafter.

Minor Ranger Ways (Ex, Archetype, 4th Level) Select one ranger class skill you did not select with ranger ways. You gain 1 bonus rank in this skill, which cannot exceed your normal maximum skill ranks. You gain an additional bonus skill rank at 6th level, and ever even class level thereafter.

Basic Study Target (Theme, 6th Level) You gain the ranger study target class ability. Your bonus never increases beyond the base +1.

Minor Ranger Methodology (Ex, Archetype, 6th Level) You gain one ranger methodology, selected from the 2nd level ranger methodologies.

Minor Ranger Style (Theme, 9th Level) You gain the first ability of your ranger theme, treating your ranger level as half your character level.

Improved Ranger Style (Theme, 12th Level) You gain the second ability of your ranger theme.

Improved Ranger Methodology (Ex, Archetype, 12th Level) You gain one ranger methodology, selected from the 2nd or 8th level ranger methodologies.

Greater Ranger Style (Theme, 18th Level) You gain the third ability of your ranger theme, and now treat your ranger level as 2/3 your character level.

Greater Ranger Methodology (Ex, Archetype, 18th Level) You gain one ranger methodology, selected from the 2nd, 8th, or 14th  level ranger methodologies.

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Witchwarper Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re continuing this week with Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We’re focusing on the classes from the COM. We did the biohacker Monday, the vanguard on Tuesday, and you can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG. So today, we continue the trend and cover the witchwarper.

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

SF Witchwarper
(art by sogsonyeka)

Witchwarper ThemeType
You have always seen flickers of other realities out of the corner of your eye, felt the breeze from parallel worlds, found yourself thinking about pasts that never happened. Unlike a true witchwarper you have never been able to devout yourself to the study and expansion of these powers, but they grow in small ways within you regardless.

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): At 1st level you gain a +1 to your Charisma score. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level): At first level, you gain two of the following skills of your choice as class skills: Bluff, Diplomacy, or Mysticism. For each selected skill, if you have the skill as a class skill from other sources at 1st level, you instead gain a +1 bonus to that skill. Once these choices are made, they cannot be changed.

Minor Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 2nd Level): Select one 1st level witchwarper spell. You can cast this spell once per day. Select two 0-level witchwarper spells. You can cast these spells at will. Your caster level for all witchwarper spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType is equal to your character level, and you use your key ability score for all calculations that normally draw on the witchwarper’s key ability score.

Basic Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 4th Level): Select two 1st level witchwarper spells. You have two 1st-level witchwarper spell slots per day you can use for any combination of the 1st-level witchwarper spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType. This replaces the 1st level spell you gained from minor witchwarper. Also select a third 0-level witchwarper spells. You can cast this spell at will.

Minor Infinite Worlds (Theme, 6th Level): You gain access to the 1st-level infinite worlds power. If you attach this themetype to a spellcasting class, you can create those effects with your own spells. If you attack this is a themetype without spells, you can create the infinite worlds once per day as if using a spell with a spell level equal to 1/3 your class level.

Minor Paradigm Shift (Sp, Archetype, 6th Level): Select one paradigm shift from the list of 2nd level paradigm shifts.

Intermediate Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 9th Level): Select one 2nd level witchwarper spell. You may cast this spell once per day.

Improved Infinite Worlds (Theme, 12th Level): If you have attached this themetype to a spellcasting class, you gain access to the 2nd and 3rd level infinite worlds effects. If you have attached this to a nonspellcasting class, you gain access to 2nd level infinite worlds effect, and can now use the ability twice per day.

Advanced Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 12th Level): Select two 2nd level witchwarper spells. You have two 2nd-level witchwarper spell slots per day you can use for any combination of the 2nd-level witchwarper spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType. This replaces the 2nd level spell you gained from intermediate witchwarping.

Greater Infinite Worlds (Theme, 18th Level): If you have attached this themetype to a spellcasting class, you gain access to the 4th level infinite worlds effects. If you have attached this to a nonspellcasting class, you gain access to 3rd level infinite worlds effect.

Greater Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype 18th): Select one 3rd level witchwarper spell. You can cast this spell once per day.

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Vanguard Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re starting this week with Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We’re focusing on the classes from the COM. We did the biohacker yesterday, and you can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG.

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

SF vanguard
(art by sogsonyeka)

Vanguard ThemeType
While you lack the in-depth level of training and devotion of a full vanguard, you have studied the supernatural arts of manipulating entropy, and apply it to your pursuits. This does not give you the mighty entropic strike vanguards possess, or their extreme level of durability, but it can swing situations in your favor in ways your foes do not expect.

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): At 1st level you gain a +1 to your Constitution score. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level): At first level, you gain either Acrobatics or Athletics as a class skill. If you have both of these as class skills from other sources at 1st level, you instead gain a +1 bonus to one of the two skills. Once these choices are made, they cannot be changed.

If you select Acrobatics, you may use your Acrobatics skill bonus as your Athletics skill bonus, and are considered trained in Athletics. If you select Athletics, you may use your Athletics skill bonus as your Acrobatics skill bonus, and are considered trained in Acrobatics.

Minor Entropic Pool (Su, Archetype, 2nd Level): You gain a limited form of the vangaurd’s Entropic Pool ability. This acts as the entropic pool, but with the following modifications.

*When combat begins, you do not gain an Entropy Point (EP)at the beg8nning of your first action. Your maximum entropy pool is 2 EP.
*You only gain entropy points by taking or receiving a critical hit in combat, or taking a full action to charge.
*You do not gain a bonus to AC for having an EP in your entropic pool.
*You can expend your EP to increase your speed, as outlined in the entropic pool class feature, or to add +1d4 damage to an unarmed attack.

Minor Mitigate (Ex, Archetype, 4th Level): You can now use EP for a weakened version of the vanguard mitigate ability. You only reduce damage by an amount equal to half your class level.

Basic Aspect (Ex, Archetype, 6th Level): Select one vanguard aspect. You gain the aspect insight of that aspect.

Basic Discipline (Ex, Theme, 6th Level): You gain one vanguard discipline, selected from the list of 2nd level vanguard disciplines. You treat your character level as your vanguard level for all vanguard disciplines gained from this themetype.

Improved Aspect (Ex, Archetype, 9th Level): You gain aspect embodiment of your aspect.

Improved Discipline (Ex, Theme, 12th Level): You gain one vanguard discipline, selected from the list of 2nd or 6th level vanguard disciplines.

Improved Entropic Pool (Ex, Archetype, 12th Level): Your entropic pool now gains EP in all the normal ways, and has a maxmum of 4 EP.

Greater Discipline (Ex, Theme, 18th Level): You gain one vanguard discipline, selected from the list of 2nd, 6th, or 10th level vanguard disciplines.

Greater Aspect (Ex, Archetype 18th): You now gain the aspect catalyst of your aspect, but not the improved aspect catalyst.

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