Category Archives: Miniatures

Strangefinder Modern: Being a Strangefinder

Strangefinder Modern are modern ideas for a strange urban fantasy world that could be played using the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and Anachronistic Adventures.

Being a Strangefinder

Strangefinders, well, they find strange things. It’s in their title, and everything. So, any Strangefinder PC must have that ability. (Strangemasters, Strangesages, and Sanchos are covered elsewhere. Well, I mean, they may be eventually.)

A Strangefinder can sense if something Strange is going one by examining the direct evidence of a manifestation of Alterniversal frequency overlap. Hearing about it and reading about it aren’t good enough, but seeing footprints,. Interviewing witnesses in person (though not by video), and, of course, being attacked by a manifestation or something caused by a manifestation are good enough.

For each day of secondary direct research (such as interviewing witnesses) a Strangefinder engages in, or each noteworthy piece of primary evidence a Strangefinder finds, the Strangefinder may make a Strange Hunch check. This has a percent chance of telling the Strangefinder is he has found something Strange, and if so what Strange Case it is connected to. The % chance is equal to 70%, +1% per Strangefinder level, +1% per Strange thing connected to the case that has been successfully identified with Strange Augury already, +10% if working with a Sancho.

On a failed check, the Strangefinder just doesn’t know yet. He never gets a false positive. If something isn’t Strangem, but is Weird, the Strangefinder learns that on a successful check, but that’s all he learns. (If there are Weirdfinders out there, they aren’t talking to us.)

As a result, Strangefinders have to go to places with unexplained or freaky occurrences, ask questions, and poke around.

Strange Cases are names a GM gives to a specific Alterniversal manifestation. This name may or may not be a hint about the Strange occurrences. Each source manifestation has a single name, sometimes with sub-titles for those that are only distantly related. For example, if an Alterniversal manifestation is from Alterniverse A, the name for it may start with A. So if gelantinous cubes from Alterniverse A have leaked into the sewers, and they are mutating local underground creatures, the Strange Case name might be “A Thing in the Sewers.”

If something mutated by a gelatinous cube has escaped and began a cult that is drawing new Strange energy into an area that might be a sub-title: “A Thing in the Sewers: Secret of the Unknown Horror.”

Once a Strangefinder knows the Strange Case she is working on, each new successful Strange Augury check allows the Strangefinder to use the Research rules from  Anachronistic Adventures to attempt to discover how to defeat the Strange monsters (if necessary), or gain a clue about the Main Plotline (as determined by the GM). One additional research check can also be earned on each Strange Case by visiting a place like Marlowe House, or (if you can find it… or it finds you) 1428 Oceanic Ave.

As a result, even if they know what they are up against, Strangefinders generally keep going into the places with freaky occurrences, poking around, and asking questions. If a Strange manifestation seems undefeatable and keeps kicking a Strangefinder’s ass, one of the best ways to learn how to defeat it is to keep pissing it off and having it kick your ass.

Strangefinders also often develop Strange Powers. We’ll (maybe) cover those later.

Diesel Pulp Models and figures

I continue to slowly modify and assemble models and figures for my Diesel Pulp headcannon setting. Obviously there’s priming and basing and painting yet to me done, these are all works in progress.

Diesel Pulp Gardland and Mulholland 01From L to R, a Garland Heavy Walker, a Free Corps Light Infantry demolitions expert, a Tumbleweed Light Mech (in back), a Heavy Infantry armor suit, a Mulholland Medium Walker, and a Free Corps Light Infantry soldier.

Diesel Pulp Allied ForcesAllied Diesel Pulp Forces
L to R: A Gardland Heavy Walker (with three of the most famous Irregulars: Sky King, All-American Girl, and The Yankee), three Free Corps mercenaries, a British “Tory” gun carrier (the famous interwar ‘Walking Pillbox’), three Heavy Infantry Armor Suits, three Medium Infantry (front) and a Gun Carrier (back), a Self-Motivated Mortar with three Yowling Yahoos (light infantry commandos), a Tumbleweed Light Mech, and a Mulholland Medium Walker (“torchie” variant).

Diesel Pulp Soviet Forces.jpgSoviet Diesel Pulp
In back, TS-1 and K-34 Medium Walkers. Along the front three “Night Ogres,” the Soviet attempt at Heavy Infantry that were too large and heavily armed and armored for anyone else to call them infantry (generally categorized as Gun Carriers by other nations). Both the walkers and the gun carriers show the distinctive sloped armor the Soviets had developed to good effect in the FT Fast Walker designs in the Interwar Period. The K-34 and leftmost Night Ogre also sport “Iron Claws,” one of the Soviet answers to their constant lack of munitions and high percentage of urban fighting (also resulting in the distinctive red-and-gray “Brickhouse” cammo patterns.
Also present two Commissars (currently sans-humpanzee troops) and a military seer (in back near the TS-1).

Diesel Pulp Dinos 01.jpg

Though the mystery of where Nazi Germany was getting dinosaurs wasn’t solved until very late in the war, in most theaters of combat the occasional unit of “Thunder Cavalry” had little enough impact that Allied planners did not consider them a major threat.
However, in Africa the dreaded Wüstedrachen were a major part of how Rommel managed to hold a large portion of the continent long after the Allies successfully cut off most routes of supply and reinforcement from the continent. The beasts were capable of outrunning and outlasting horses, camels, and even jeeps, could allow expert troops to carry significant material and even anti-tank weapons, and the higher portion of light troops without armor support made their close combat abilities more relevant.
Here three Wüstedrachen are seen alongside two interwar Italian C3/33 Mechettes. While Mechettes saw only limited use in Europe, Rommel made good use of what Italian forces he had, and employed them effectively as scouting and infantry support, often in conjunction with Wüstedrachen or Medium Infantry.

Diesel Pulp US Walkers

Medium

Diesel Pulp US Walkers a1

I’m making progress on my US walkers for Diesel Pulp.

The S4a1, a2, and a3 Mulholland Medium Walkers were among the most common walkers in the First Global War, and the US manufactured more than 50,000 of them. Originally conceived as an all-purpose armor unit, its ability to match German units — Gautaz Light Walkers and the Teiwaz Medium walker — when put into service by the British in 1942 lead American military planners to believe no heavier armor unit was required. However, by the middle of the Global War it was clear the mech’s light armament and thin armor could not compete with newer Wotan and Donar Medium Walkers, or even the Russian K34 Medium Walker. Though clearly more powerful than any light walker, it was often called “The lightest of the medium-weights.” Its stability and long-term combat staying power were second-to-none, but it simply wasn’t a match for mid- and late-war Medium walkers. Luckily, it was mass produced in vast numbers, so rarely was a single Mulholland tasked with taking an enemy Medium tank 1-on-1.
When the S26 Garland began production in 1944, many Mulhollands were retrofit as variants, and thousands continued to be produced as off-the-line variants. The Torchie flamethrower-variant was among the most common, designed to supplement combined arms attacks against fortifications, urban settings, or heavy infantry. Other late-war Mulhollands were converted to engineering walkers, walker recovery vehicles, self-propelled artillery, experimental weapon platforms, and mech hunters (with much heavier guns and open turrets).
The British successfully adapted the Mulholland to carry their heavy 17-pounder anti-armor gun, and the upgunned “Mulholland Wasp” was among the most popular walkers among British armor crews.

While disagreements about proper walker battle doctrine (especially the role of mech hunters and medium and heavy walkers) delayed the production of the S26 Garland until 1944, it quickly proved extremely effective in battle. Unlike the Mulholland, the Garland was heavy even for a Heavy Walker (and some historians claim it should properly be classified as a Superheavy Walker), and its two most common main armaments — a 90mm gun or a 1.21g Tesla cannon — remained effective against enemy armor for the duration of the war.