Blog Archives

Introducing the Spell-Fist

A Pathfinder-compatible multiclass character concept. Definitely NOT a “classic” multiclass combo, but if the number of people I see playing monks with wands is any indication (and yes, I know it isn’t), this is a popular concept. Maybe you are from a post-apocalyptic future and have a martial art style named after a constellation. Maybe a monkey taught you to fight and do magic tricks. Maybe you punched a dragon in the heart while training. Who knows? You’re a spell-fist now.

Begin with Unchained Monk.

Your monk level counts as your sorcerer level for any prerequisites. Any monk class feature (or feat with special rules for monks) that makes calculations using Wisdom, instead use Charisma. Your base attack bonus uses the normal monk chart, rather than the unchained monk chart.

Force of Ki: When unarmed and unencumbered, you may use your Charisma modifier in place of your Dexterity modifier for any calculation that normally uses Dexterity, including your AC, Initiative Bonus, and ranged attack rolls. Additionally, when unarmored and unencumbered, you gain a +1 bonus to your AC, Initiative, and CMB and CMD at 4th level, and every 4 levels thereafter.

This replaces the normal monk AC bonus.

Spells: You have spells known and spells per day as a bard of the same level, but you draw these spells from the sorcerer spell list. This replaces the bonus feat gained at 1st level, 2nd level, and every 4 levels thereafter and flurry of blows.

Spell-Fist: At 2nd level when you use Stunning Blow, you may replace the stunning effect with a spell with a casting time of 1 standard action or less. This spell must affect an area or one of more targets, and deal damage, require an attack roll, or force targets to make a saving throw. This spell affects only the target of your stunning first. Casting this spell does not provoke an attack of opportunity. If it is a melee touch spell, if your attack misses you retain the charge and may add it to the next unarmed strike your hit with, as long as you take no action beforehand that would cause you to lose the charge.

You do not gain the ability to add other effects to your stunning fist beginning at 4th level.

This ability modifies Stunning Fist.

Ki Pool: At 3rd level you can spend 1 ki to gain one additional attack when you take a full attack action, even if you are not using flurry of blows. This ability modified ki pool.

Flurry of Blows: At 10th level you gain flurry of blows, but treat your monk level as your spell-fist level -9.

Speaking of Cool Stuff!

This post was sponsored by one of my patreon backers, Christen N Sowards! Christen is currently wrapping up a Kickstarter, City of 7 Seraphs! It has three days to go, and is almost funded. I have nothing to do with it but it sure looks cool. Check it out!

Advertisements

Star-Crossed Races: The Lashirren

Continuing the idea of Starfinder-compatible crossbreed races, we present the lashirren. You can go back and find our first crossbreed, the aeshun, here.

Lashirren

Lashirren are the product of two shirren parents, and one lashunta parent, and only exist as a result of powerful magic. In general the two species are not in any way genetically compatible, but with delicate application of transmutation and conjuration magic, it is possible for one shirren and one lashunta parent to combine their genetic material into an embryo that then gestates in a shirren host. This step is rarely taken but the shirren drive for individuality, even from the shackles of species, sometimes leads to situations where it is seen as desirable.

Lashirren view the world differently than any of their parents, and indeed each lashirren appears to form a worldview unique to them, and often incomprehensible to others. This often leads to valuable insights missed by those who accept common theories as to how and why things work, but it also sets lashirren apart, and sometimes sets them down long rabbit-holes of false equivalence or misunderstood phenomena. While shirren delight in the individualist approach of lashirren, other races often find them obtuse and frustrating.

Appearance: Lashirren look much like lashunta, but have ridges of chitin across their brow and protecting most joints, knuckles, and the soles of their feet. Their coloration generally matches one of their shirren parents, with their hair generally green, black, or deep brown.

Racial Traits

HP: 6

Dimorphic: All lashirren have a deep understanding of how differences drive the universe, but can become so emgoressed in contemplating such differences they overlook practical matters. Lashirren all have +2 Wisdom, and -2 Intelligence. Like their lashunta parents, lashirren are dimorphic and at puberty can choose to become muscular korasha (+2 Strength), or nimble damaya (+2 Dexterity).

Size and Type: Lashirren are medium humanoids with the lashunta and shirren subtypes, and a 30 foot speed.

Blindsense: As the shirren racial ability.

Focus: Lashirren often become strongly focused on one idea or skill early in their lives. Select one skill. If it not a class skill for your theme or first class level, gain it as a class skill. If it is a class skill from some source other than your race, you gain a +1 bonus to all skill checks.

Individualism: A lashirren knows that ultimately it is alone in the universe, and must depend on itself above all others. Once per day, as long as no ally is within 10 feet, a lashirren can roll a single attack roll or skill check twice and take the higher result.

Limited telepathy: As the lashunta racial trait.

Vital Statistics

Lashirren stand between 5’ and 7’ tall, weigh between 120 lbs. and 180 lbs., with korasha skewing on the shorter but heavier side of those numbers. They reach maturity at 10,
aging similarly (though not as quickly) as their shirren parents, and have a maximum age of 60 +3d10 years.

This Post Sponsored By

Justin Andrew Mason! Justin backed MY Patreon at a level that calls for a monthly shout out to him as a supporter of this blog. You can go check out what Justin is up to at HIS Patreon, which produces dungeon maps for VTT and tabletop RPG play!

Star-Crossed Races: The Aeshun

Yep, it’s time for more out-their ideas for the Starfinder Roleplaying Game! (And remember folks, this is unofficial, third-party, Rogue Genius Games content!)

The core rulebook presents two crossbreed races—the half-elf and half-orc. It also presents a universe with multiple species sharing the same homeworlds (elves and lashunta, for example), biotech grafts, powerful magic, and machine gods. It seems unlikely that with all those environment-changing, reality-warping options, no new crossbreed races would emerge.

So over the next week or so I’ll be presenting three crossbreeds – the aeshun (elf/lashunta), lashirren (lashunta/shirren), and vorruk (orc/vesk) – each with a different circumstance leading to their creation.

Aeshun

Aeshun are the crossbreed children of elven and lashunta parents. While mating between elves and lashunta is not uncommon, the production of aeshun is. Fewer than 1 in 100 elf/lashuna couples produce children, and even among those that do roughly half are indistinguishable from damaya lashunta (though they are born with that state already in place, rather than selecting it at puberty). Aeshun are often seen as miracles by parents that build lasting, living relationships—but can also be viewed as burdens by couples that are already unstable in their relationship, or not ready for the additional stress a child brings.

Aeshun are gifted with natural curiosity and unusual ways of looking at the world, but their heritage causes each aeshun to have their own innate strengths and weaknesses. Generally considered curiosities by lashunta (who often wish to study them), and dangerous wild cards by elves (who generally don’t trust aeshun they don’t personally know well), aeshun often have trouble fitting in on their hoemworld. However once they leave their native lands and travel into the larger galaxy, they often find truly alien races have no preconceived notions of what aeshun should be like, and do not care about their unusual lineage.

Appearance: Aeshun appear to be tall, lithe elves with lashunta-like antennae (though roughly one in 16 aeshun lacks the antennae). Their skin is even and smooth, though coloration can range from creamy to dark. Many have natural patterns of darker skin in small spots or lines along their temples, spines, and lower back. They have pupils, unlike their elven parents, and their hair and eye color generally match, but can be of nearly any hue.

Racial Traits

2 HP

Ability Adjustments: Though aeshun are all generally tall and lean, their actual natural talents range from being strong and wise, to weak but tough and nimble, to likeable and bright but klutzy. It’s not quite true that no two aeshun are alike, but they do have a broad range of inherent advantages and drawbacks. An aeshun gains +2 to any 2 ability scores, and -2 to any 1 ability score. These modifier must be applied to three different ability scores.

Size and Type: Aeshun are medium humanoids with the elf and lashunta subtypes, and a 30 foot speed.

Aeshun Magic: At character creation select either the elven magic racial trait, or the lashunta magic racial trait.

Limited telepathy: As the lashunta racial trait.

Low-Light Vision: As the elven racial trait.

Vital Statistics

Aeshun stand between 5’10” and 6’6” tall, weigh between 150 lbs. and 200 lbs. They reach maturity at 17, much faster than either parent race, but rarely know when their natural time is up due to a tendency to die suddenly with little sign of aging, with a maximum age of 300 + 3d100 years.

Pateon-Exclusive

I also posted the similar-but-not-the-same-idea of android ratfolk, the e-soki, over at my patreon as (for the moment) patron-exclusive content. Check it out!

Sponsored By!

This post is brought to you by the backers of my patreon, and in this case is specifically sponsored by supports of Glenbuckle Publishing, who wanted to draw attention to the Gardener base class! Here’s the description, from DriveTrhuRPG!

Life is always Greener with a Gardener around!

Have your field and grow it too with the new gardener base class, the triumphant return of Glenbuckie Publishing! Enjoy a new base class with the potential to cultivate plants that interrupt your foes’ actions, find stability in slow-and-steady strikes, and become a soldier that bridges the path between civilization and nature!”

Return of the Cleric/Fighter/Magic-User!

When I get on a “old-school multiclass concepts for Pathfinder” kick I generally do several in a row as ideas rattle around in my head. So far I’ve done the anruth (an old school druidic bard), cavalier-paladincleric/assassincleric/fighter/thief, cleric/ranger, druid/fighterfighter/magic-user/thief, illusionist/thiefthief-acrobat, as well as randomly acquired psionics, and even the fighter/illusionist at my patreon.

That doesn’t leave a lot of “legal” old-school combinations… but it DOES leave the dreaded cleric/fighter/magic-user!

When looking to combine the spell power of two of the most powerful spellcasters with the weapon and armor expertise of the fighter, there are two obvious places to begin – the magus, and the warpriest. Either makes sense as an opening class for a cleric/fighter/magic-user, but having built the druid/fighter off the magus yesterday I’m going to start with the warpriest this time.

A warpriest is a fine cleric/fighter, but obviously has no magic-user in it at all. It also has some things we can likely cut while still feeling fairly divinely-inspired and martial, which gives us room to expand its spell list and class features to include some wizardly material.

Cleric/Fighter/Magic-User

The cleric/fighter/magic-user is an archetype for the warpriest that also counts as a hybrid class of the cleric, fighter, and wizard classes.

Spellcasting: You cast spells drawn from the cleric and wizard spell lists. You cast cleric spells as divine spells, and wizard spells as arcane spells. You have access to all cleric spells of a spell level you can cast, but must add wizard spells to a spellbook as a wizard does. You begin play with a spellbook with all 0-level wizard spells, and a number of 1st level wizard spells equal to 1 + your Intelligence bonus. At each new class level, you can add any 1 wizard spell of a level you can cast to your spellbook. You otherwise learn new spells and scribe them into your spellbook as a wizard does.

Your Wisdom determines what level spell you can cast, your bonus spells, and the save DCs of any cleric spell you cast. Your Intelligence determines the save DC of any wizard spell you cast.

You can cast any spells you gain as a cleric/fighter/magic-user in armor without having to deal with arcane spell failure, but suffer normal ASFfor arcane spells you gain from other sources.

All your spells gained from this class (cleric and wizard) count as warpriest spells for purposes of other class features (such as fervor).

This modifies the cleric/fighter/magic-user’s spells.

Fight Smarter (Ex): A cleric/fighter/magic-user has learned to fuse his training with gods, spells, and fighting into a single art. At 1st level, you can add your Intelligence bonus, instead of your Strength bonus, to attack rolls and weapon damage rolls. When using a weapon that would normally only allow you to add half your Strength bonus to damage you may only add half your Intelligence bonus, but when using a weapon that would normally allow you to add x1.5 or x2 (or more) of your Strength bonus to damage, you can only add x1 your Intelligence bonus. (If your bonus to damage from Strength would thus be better than your bonus to damage from intelligence, you may use your bonus to damage from Strength.)

Additionally, treat your cleric/fighter/magic-user levels as fighter levels when meeting prerequisites for feats.

This ability replaces focus weapon and sacred weapon.

Domains and Schools: At 1st level you select one cleric domain granted by your god, and one wizard school. These have no effect on your spells per day, spells known, chance to learn spells, and so on. One of these selections is your primary selection, and the other is secondary. For your primary selection, you gain special abilities as if your cleric/fighter/magic-user level was your level in the appropriate class. For your secondary selection, you treat your cleric/fighter/magic-user -3 as your level in the appropriate class.

This ability replaces all minor blessings and sacred armor.

Bonus Feats: You gain a bonus feat at 3rd level, and every 3 levels thereafter, as a normal warpriest does. In addition to combat feats, you may select from any item creation or metamagic feat you meet the prerequisites for as bonus feats.

This ability modifies bonus feats.

Spell Combat (Ex): At 10th level, you gain spell combat as the magus class feature. You can use it with any light or 1-handed melee weapon, or with your deity’s favorite weapon. If your deity’s favorite weapon takes 2-hands, you can cast spells when wielding 2-handed it as if you had one hand free.

This ability replaces major blessings.

This Post Brought to By:

City of Seven Seraphs – A Planar Campaign Capstone for PFRPG!

Seriously, this amazing-looking Kickstarter campaign (which I have nothing to do with) supported me through my Patreon, and earn themselves this plug! Go check it out, and see if it looks like something you want to support! You have until September 9!

Return of the Druid/Fighter

Yep, we’re back to doing old-school multiclass concepts for Pathfinder. There aren’t a lot of classic “old school” multiclass combinations left I haven’t addressed, having done the anruth (an old school druidic bard), cavalier-paladincleric/assassincleric/fighter/thief, cleric/rangerfighter/magic-user/thief, illusionist/thiefthief-acrobat, as well as randomly acquired psionics, and even the fighter/illusionist at my patreon.

But we haven’t done a druid/fighter.

You could emulate a lot of druid/fighter builds with the hunter, but that saddles you with an animal companion, and doesn’t give you any wildshape. Plus, we already have a magus, so a true hybrid 9-level caster/fighter seems in reach.

The Druid/Fighter (Strider)

A strider is a magus archetype that also counts as a hybrid druid/fighter class. The stride has the following changes.

Armor Proficiency: The strider cannot wear metal armor or use a metal shield. A strider who wears prohibited armor or uses a prohibited shield is unable to cast strider spells or use any of her supernatural or spell-like class abilities while doing so and for 24 hours thereafter.

Spells: A strider knows all spells of the spell levels he can cast from the druid and ranger spell lists, rather than the magus spell list. She treats this as the magus class list for purposes of what class features and magus arcana work with her spells.

Unarmed Arcana (Su): At 3rd level a strider can apply any magus class feature that she could apply to a held melee weapon to her unarmed and natural attacks. (Once she can shapeshift this includes using spellstrike with natural attacks, though she would need Natural Spell to complete the verbal and somatic components of spells while using wild shape.)

This ability replaces the magus arcana gained at 3rd level.

Wild Shape (Su): At 4th level, a strider can wild shape as a druid of the same level.

This ability replaces spell recall, knowledge pool, improved spell combat, improved spell recall, heavy armor, greater spell combat, counterstrike, greater spell access, and true magus.

Natural Weapon Master (Ex): A strider can apply any feat she has taken that normally applies to only one weapon or one set of weapons to any natural attacks she has that would have been legal selections for the feat.

This replaces the bonus feat gained at 5th level.

Woodland Ways: Beginning at 6th level, a strider can select the following druid class features as magus arcana: wild empathy, woodland stride, trackless step, venom immunity, a thousand faces, timeless body. The strider must have a class level at least equal to the level that a druid gains the selected ability, and treats her class level as her druid level for such abilities.

A strider cannot select any magus arcana that duplicates a spell from the magus or wizard spell list (unless it is also on the druid or ranger spell list), or that involves gaining additional spells known, regaining spells, or using spells from other class lists with magus class features.

This ability modifies magus arcana.

Starfinder: Make Some Noise

We continue our look at some of the weirder classic magic items, and how they can be updated to the Starfinder Roleplaying Game.

But first, an aside.

All Starfinder content offered here is third-party material provided under the Open Gaming License and the Starfinder Compatability License. It is not official. It is not available for use in Starfinder Society organized play. It’s not even in its final form. It’s just fun thought experiments that may, or may not, ever show up in a rogue Genius Games product someday.

Air-Horn of Interruption
Hybrid Item
Level: Varies (see text)     Cost: Varies (see text)
Bulk: L

Air-horns of interruption can be found at various item levels, from level 7 and up. They have the same price as the cheapest armor upgrade of the same level from the Starfinder Core Rulebook. When the air-horn is held, you can ready a standard action to use an air-horn of interruption to use against a creature when it next casts a spell. This is a purely defensive action, and the readied action preempts the target’s action if it attempts to cast a spell or use a spell-like ability. When the readied action goes off, you make a ranged attack against the target’s EAC. If your attack hits you do 1 point of damage, and the target loses the spell (and its spell slot). Once you have successfully caused a target to lose a spell with this device, it is immune to the air-horn of interruption for 24 hours.

More Star Magic

I have a Patreon, which supports this blog and is sometimes home of some exclusively-patron bonus content.

Even More Star Options

There are tons of new PC options for the Starfinder Roleplaying Game in the Starfarer’s Companionavailable at DriveThruRPG, Paizo, and the Open Gaming Store!

Astra Arcanis I

Two new Starfinder Roleplaying Game spells! Both based on vehicles.

Polymorph Vehicle (Technomancer 3)
Casting Time 1 full action
Range touch
Target One vehicle with an item level no greater than your caster level
Duration 1 hour/level
Saving Throw Fortitude negates (object)      Spell Resistance yes

You can transmute a vehicle (but not starship) into any other vehicle of a lower item level. The vehicle becomes a typical, “stock” version of the new vehicle, not one that has any special equipment or upgrades. The vehicle must be empty of all passengers and cargo to be affected by this spell. The vehicle retains any damage it had on it before you cast the spell, and if this damage would causes it to be broken or have 0 HP in its new form, the spell fails. At the end of the spells duration, the vehicle is restored of half the damage it took in its transformed form. When the spell ends (even if dispelled), it takes one minute for the vehicle to assume its original form, and any creature or cargo that cannot fit in the new form is ejected harmlessly at the end of this time.

Vehicle Link (Mystic 3)
Casting Time 1 standard action
Range touch
Target One creature and one vehicle
Duration 1 hour/level
Saving Throw Fortitude negates (object)      Spell Resistance yes

You forge an eldritch bond between one creature and a specific vehicle that creature is within. The creature gains an intuitive understanding of the vehicle and its control, allowing the creature to use Acrobatics checks in place of Pilot checks to operate the vehicle, and granting the creature a +2 circumstance bonus to all skill checks made in regards to the vehicle. Additionally, anytime the vehicle takes damage, the creature may opt to reduce the damage the vehicle takes by half, and apply that amount of damage to itself. The creature must make this decision immediately after the amount of damage done to the vehicle is determined.

More Star Magic

I have a Patreon, where I posted the reload spell for mystics and tecnomancers as (at the moment) exclusively-patron bonus content.

Even More Star Options

There are tons of new spells for the Starfinder Roleplaying Game in the Starfarer’s Companion, available at DriveThruRPG, Paizo, and the Open Gaming Store!

Rats, Wereratrats!

Adventure idea: A community of unusually short-tailed, round-headed ratfolk (an ethnicity called ‘voles’ by other local races) who live in borrows (boroughs?) outside a major city have begun to be assaulted and driven out of local markets by rougher citizens of the city. The settlers accuse the ratfolk of theft, and desecration of several shrines within the city, saying the ratfolk move through the city’s sewers and drains, and have even been seen trying to get at children asleep in their homes.

The ratfolk proclaim their innocence, and point out they warned the city’s leaders weeks ago that wererats had been spotted in the thick brush of a nearby woods. The ratfolk believe the wererats have infected some city dwellers. The city government thinks the ratfolk are making false claims about wererats to protect some ratfolk hooligans, and thus aren’t taking it seriously.

Thus the ratfolk need help, because the wererats (who do indeed walk among them, including a few wererat ratfolk who only have a modest appearance change in hybrid form) are a demon cult who wish to summon agents of their demonic patron, a scavenger lord who spreads disease and uses vrocks as his agents. The wererats have summoned one vrock already, and want two more so they can do a dance of ruin beneath the city streets! So, the rastfolk want to hire some outsiders (the PCs) to fairly investigate.

The players must separate fact from fiction, deal with hunting down were rats both in the city sewers and hiding in plain site among the ratfllk, and ultimately deal with the apocalyptic whereat demon cult’s plans.

The name of the adventure?

“Vrock and Vole”

Hit or Myth

I often play with new mythologies when writing up new campaign worlds, and some work out better than others. When making new mythologies, I like to remember that real-world mythology is often much, much weirder and more primal than the neat pantheons we often get in RPGs.

It’s a fantasy world. Have fun with it. And\ example:

“Think you that first came gods in man-form, in the shape of elf or dwarf was born divinity? Now, all these gods are but recent tribes, attested by those who build shrines to the power that look onto them.

Before the god tribes were the Hrimthur, the storm gods, and the Svadilfar, the horse gods. The Hrimthur sought to freeze or drown or shatter with wind and lightning all living things, and of all the first animals, it was the noble horse gods, the Svadilfar, who put the Hrimthur in check. Long were their battles, but in time the Hrumthur were driven back to the mountains and oceans, from where to this day their make their assaults in the storm seasons.

The Svadilfar sought to heal the world damaged by their battles, and the eldest and wisest of them, the mare Sleinyrsa, saw among the animals two that were more clever. She selected them, the female Freafar and her mate the male Wojanan, to aid in rebuilding the world. They were allowed to ride on Sleinyrsa herself, and thus became gods, and selectors of dead animals to also ride upon the Svadilfar. And this god riders became the tribes of tool-using gods, second only to the Svadilfar, and kin to the Raven King gods, who also learned of tools.

And from these tribes later come all the gods of elf, and gnome, and dwarf, and man.”

Return of the Illusionist/Thief!

There aren’t a lot of classic “old school” multiclass combinations left I haven’t addressed, having done the anruth (an old school druidic bard), cavalier-paladincleric/assassincleric/fighter/thief, cleric/rangerfighter/magic-user/thiefthief-acrobat, as well as randomly acquired psionics, and even the fighter/illusionist at my patreon. At least—there aren’t a lot left I think actually need any help to be used in Pathfinder. There are good ways to create characters filling the roles of the cleric/fighter (warpriest, inquisitor), cleric/magic user (Rogue Genius Games’ magister class), fighter/magic-user (magus), fighter/thief (just do a multiclass fighter/rogue), fighter/assassin (a fighter/rogue can take the assassin prestige class, or you can just play a slayer), and magic-user/thief (the eldritch scoundrel rogue archetype).

But there is still at least one I think would be tricky to build in a satisfying way in Pathfinder—the illusionist/thief. Being an illusionist has specific keynotes in Pathfinder, and it’s hard to hit those with any class with good rogue ability without losing significant effectiveness.

So, taking notes from the unchained rogue, the eldritch scoundrel, the arcanist, and my own fighter/illusionist, here’s a hybrid class for the illusionist/thief.

The Illusionist/Thief

Alignment: Any

Hit Die: d8

Starting Wealth: 5d6 × 10 gp (average 140 gp.) In addition, each character begins play with an outfit worth 10 gp or less.

Class Skills

The illusionist/thief’s’s class skills are Acrobatics (Dex), Appraise (Int), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Disable Device (Dex), Disguise (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (dungeoneering) (Int), Knowledge (local) (Int), Linguistics (Int), Perception (Wis), Perform (Cha), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Sleight of Hand (Dex), Spellcraft (Int), Stealth (Dex), Swim (Str), and Use Magic Device (Cha).

Skill Ranks per Level: 6 + Int modifier.

Table: Illusionist/Thief

Level  Base Attack Bonus    Fort Save        Ref Save         Will Save        Special

1st       +0        +0        +2        +0        Finesse training, sneak attack +1, trapfinding

2nd      +1        +0        +3        +0        Rogue talent

3rd       +2        +1        +3        +1        Finesse training, sneak attack +1d6

4th       +3        +1        +4        +1        Debilitating injury, rogue talent, uncanny dodge

5th       +3        +1        +4        +1        Sneak attack +2d4

6th       +4        +2        +5        +2        Rogue talent

7th       +5        +2        +5        +2        Sneak attack +2d6

8th       +6/+1  +2        +6        +2        Rogue talent

9th       +6/+1  +3        +6        +3        Sneak attack +3d6

10th     +7/+2  +3        +7        +3        Advanced talents, rogue talent

11th     +8/+3  +3        +7        +3        Finesse training, sneak attack +4d6

12th     +9/+4  +4        +8        +4        Rogue talent

13th     +9/+4  +4        +8        +4        Sneak attack +5d6

14th     +10/+5 +4        +9        +4        Rogue talent

15th     +11/+6/+1       +5        +9        +5        Sneak attack +6d6

16th     +12/+7/+2       +5        +10      +5        Rogue talent

17th     +12/+7/+2       +5        +10      +5        Sneak attack +7d6

18th     +13/+8/+3       +6        +11      +6        Rogue talent

19th     +14/+9/+4       +6        +11      +6        Finesse training, sneak attack +8d6

20th     +15/+10/+5     +6        +12      +6        Master caster, rogue talent

Class Features

The following are the class features of the illusionist/thief.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Illusionist thieves are proficient with all simple weapons, plus the hand crossbow, rapier, sap, short sword, and shortbow. They are proficient with cloth light armor (but no armor with a significant amount of metal or leather), but not with shields. Their illusionist/thief spells suffer no ASF when they wear light armor composed primarily of cloth.

Favored Class Bonuses

A character that takes a level of illusionist/thief as a favored class can select any favored class bonus the character would receive as a rogue or a wizard, as long as the selected favored class bonus does not grant or modify a class feature the illusionist/thief lacks.

Spellcasting and Illusions

An illusionist/thief has access to a broad range of magic, but can only cast a very few spells per day. This requires her to depend on her skills and talents for much of her adventuring effectiveness, while giving her the option to use spells when a situation becomes dire or when she can find some long-term synergy to deal with a problem.

At 1st level the illusionist/thief casts spells drawn from the bard class list (though she cannot cast any spell that requires or modifies a class feature she does not have, such as bardic performance), and all wizard illusions spells. The illusionist/thief gains the arcane school wizard class feature (including being able to prepare one additional spell of the specialized school for each spell level she can cast), but may only select the illusion school (or its associated focused schools) to specialize in, and automatically has evocation as its opposed school (but does not have to select a second opposed school). The illusionist/thief uses her illusionist/thief level as her wizard level for the illusion arcane school abilities.

An illusionist/thief can prepare a number of spells per day as a magus of her level, and uses Charisma to determine her bonus spells, maximum spell level she can learn or prepare,

To learn, prepare, or cast a spell, the illusionist/thief must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell’s level. The saving throw DC against an illusionist/thief’s spell is 10 + the spell’s level + the illusionist/thief’s Intelligence modifier.

An illusionist/thief can only cast a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. Her base daily spell allotment is given on Table: Illusionist/thief under “Spells per Day.” In addition, she receives bonus spells per day if she has a high Charisma score.

An illusionist/thief may know any number of spells, but the number she can prepare each day is limited. At 1st level, she can prepare four 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells each day. At each new illusionist/thief level, the number of spells she can prepare each day increases, adding new spell levels (using the same chart as the spells per day of the magus). Unlike the number of spells she can cast per day, the number of spells an arcanist can prepare each day is not affected by her Charisma score. Feats and other effects that modify the number of spells known by a spellcaster instead affect the number of spells an illusionist/thief can prepare.

An illusionist/thief must choose and prepare her spells ahead of time by getting 8 hours of sleep and spending 1 hour studying her spellbook. While studying, the illusionist/thief decides what spells to prepare and refreshes her available spell slots for the day.

Like a sorcerer, an illusionist/thief can choose to apply any metamagic feats she knows to a prepared spell as she casts it, with the same increase in casting time (see Spontaneous Casting and Metamagic Feats). However, she may also prepare a spell with any metamagic feats she knows and cast it without increasing casting time like a wizard. She cannot combine these options—a spell prepared with metamagic feats cannot be further modified with another metamagic feat at the time of casting.

Table: Illusionist/thief Spells Per Day

Class               Spell Level

Level   1          2          3          4          5          6

1          1          –           –           –           –           –

2          1          –           –           –           –           –

3          1          –           –           –           –           –

4          2          1          –           –           –           –

5          2          1          –           –           –           –

6          2          1          –           –           –           –

7          3          2          1          –           –           –

8          3          2          1          –           –           –

9          3          2          1          –           –           –

10        3          3          2          1          –           –

11        3          3          2          1          –           –

12        3          3          2          1          –           –

13        3          3          3          1          1          –

14        3          3          3          1          1          –

15        3          3          3          1          1          –

16        3          3          3          2          1          1

17        3          3          3          2          1          1

18        3          3          3          2          1          1

19        3          3          3          2          2          1

20        3          3          3          2          2          1

Sneak Attack

If an illusionist/thief can catch an opponent when he is unable to defend himself effectively from her attack, she can strike a vital spot for extra damage.

The illusionist/thief’s attack deals extra damage anytime her target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to AC (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the illusionist/thief flanks her target, or when the illusionist/thief has convinced the target she is something other than an armed humanoid (normally with an illusion)—in which case the illusion ends with the first sneak attack. This extra damage is +1 point at 1st level, 1d6 at 3rd level, 2d4 at 5th level, 2d6 at 7th level, and increases by 1d6 every 2 illusionist/thief levels thereafter. Ranged attacks can count as sneak attacks only if the target is within 30 feet. This additional damage is precision damage and is not multiplied on a critical hit.

With a weapon that deals nonlethal damage (such as a sap, unarmed strike, or whip), a illusionist/thief can make a sneak attack that deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage. She cannot use a weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage in a sneak attack—not even with the usual –4 penalty.

The illusionist/thief must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. A illusionist/thief cannot sneak attack while striking a creature with total concealment.

Trapfinding

An illusionist/thief adds 1/3 her level on Perception checks to locate traps and on Disable Device checks (minimum +1). An illusionist/thief can use Disable Device to disarm magic traps.

Finesse Training (Ex)

At 1st level, an illusionist/thief gains Weapon Finesse as a bonus feat. In addition, starting at 3rd level, she can select any one type of weapon that can be used with Weapon Finesse (such as rapiers or daggers). Once this choice is made, it cannot be changed. Whenever she makes a successful melee attack with the selected weapon, she adds her Dexterity modifier instead of her Strength modifier to the damage roll. If any effect would prevent the illusionist/thief from adding her Strength modifier to the damage roll, she does not add her Dexterity modifier. The illusionist/thief can select a second weapon at 11th level and a third at 19th level.

Rogue Talents

As an illusionist/thief gains experience, she learns a number of talents that aid her and confound her foes. Starting at 2nd level, an illusionist/thief gains one unchained rogue talent. She gains an additional rogue talent for every 2 levels attained after 2nd level. An illusionist/thief cannot select an individual talent more than once. She may select evasion (as the rogue lass feature) as a talent and, if she does, may select improved evasion as a talent beginning at 8th level. She may also select uncanny dodge as a talent and if she does, may select improved uncanny dodge as a talent beginning at 8th level.

Talents marked with an asterisk add effects to an illusionist/thief’s sneak attack. Only one of these talents can be applied to an individual attack, and the decision must be made before the attack roll is made.

Debilitating Injury (Ex)

At 4th level, whenever an illusionist/thief deals sneak attack damage to a foe, she can also debilitate the target of her attack, causing it to take a penalty for 1 round (this is in addition to any penalty caused by a rogue talent or other special ability). The illusionist/thief can choose to apply any one of the following penalties when the damage is dealt.

Befuddled: The target becomes befuddled, taking a –2 penalty to saving throws against illusions and to Perception checks, and being considered distracted for purposes of creatures being able to make Stealth checks against it. The target takes an additional –2 penalty to saving throws against illusions cast by the illusionist/thief and to Perception checks regarding the illusionist/thief. At 10th level and 16th level, the penalties increase by –2 (to a total maximum of –8).

Disoriented: The target takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls. In addition, the target takes an additional –2 penalty on all attack rolls it makes against the illusionist/thief. At 10th level and 16th level, the penalty on attack rolls made against the illusionist thief increases by –2 (to a total maximum of –8).

Hampered: All of the target’s speeds are reduced by half (to a minimum of 5 feet). In addition, the target cannot take a 5-foot step.

These penalties do not stack with themselves, but additional attacks that deal sneak attack damage extend the duration by 1 round. A creature cannot suffer from more than one penalty from this ability at a time. If a new penalty is applied, the old penalty immediately ends. Any form of healing applied to a target suffering from one of these penalties also removes the penalty.

Advanced Talents

At 10th level and every 2 levels thereafter, an illusionist/thief can choose an unchained rogue advanced talents in place of a rogue talent.

Master Caster (Ex)

At 20th level, once per round an illusionist/thief can combine the casting of a spell with a casting time of 1 standard action or less with a sneak attack. The spell affects only the target of the sneak attack, the number of sneak attack dice done is reduced by the level of the spell cast, and the spell does not provoke an attack of opportunity. If the spell has a range of touch, the attack roll for the sneak attack counts as the touch attack roll.

If I May Steal a Moment of Your Time.

I have a Patreon. I even posted two illusionist/thief talents there, as bonus content, currently exclusively for patrons.

Check it out!