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Hex Rounds and Wandshells for Starfinder

Yesterday we presented spell guns and runethrowers, magic devices that can produce spell effects from battery power. The next obvious question is — can you have magic bullets that produce spell effects?

Of course you can. Presenting: Magic Muntions!

Magic Bullet
(art by Yuri Hoyda)

Magic Munitions                     Item       Credit
Item                                            Level      Cost       Bulk
Hex round, 0-level spell          2             140           L
Wandshell, 0-level spell          3             325           L
Hex round, 1st-level spell       5             450           L
Wandshell, 1st-level spell       7             750           L
Hex round, 2nd-level spell     8          1,400           L
Wandshell, 2nd-level spell    11         3,250           L
Hex round, 3rd-level spell     11         3,700           L
Hex round, 4th-level spell      14       10,600          L
Wandshell, 3rd-level spell      15       17,500          L
Hex round, 5th-level spell      17       36,650          L
Wandshell, 4th-level spell      19       81,000          L
Hex round, 6th-level spell      20     112,800          L

Magic munitions allow you to load a one-shot, consumable version of a spell into a weapon. Any spell with a casting time of no more than 1 standard action, that does not require Resolve Points or materials with a cost, can be turned into a magic munition. Activating a magic munition is a standard action, and when you do so the weapon does not have its normal effect (and does not use any ammo or battery beyond the magic munition). The magic effect normally originates as if you had cast the spell. If the spell has a range of touch, you can instead target any legal target within the weapon’s reach of first range increment. The caster level for the spell effect is equal to the magic munition;s item level.

A hex round can only be fired from a spell gun or runethrower able to cast a spell of the same or higher level, or a weapon with the spellthrower fusion. A wandshell can be loaded into any weapon. As magic munitions these ammos can be loaded into any ranged or melee weapon, even ones not designed for physical ammunition or that are normally totally unpowered. Loading a single he round or wandshell into a weapon is a move action. A weapon can’t have more total item levels worth of magic muntions loaded into it at a time than its own item level. Thus a item level 9 laser pistol with the spellthrowing fusion could have one hex round with a 2nd-level spell, or three wandshells with 0-level spells.

Magic munitions not loaded into a weapon are easily identified as magical at a glance, of even by their unusually heavy heft. Most have the spell loaded into them carefully noted on their casing. You cannot craft a a magic munition of a specific spell unless you can cast that spell, or have someone able to cast the spell available to do so when you create the munition.

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Spellguns and Runethrowers for Starfinder

As soon as you say a setting has spellcasters and blasters, there’s a group of players who want to have spellguns. And that’s fair. After all there are numerous examples of spell-generating hybrid technology in science-fantasy fiction (my specific inspirations come from The Irregular at Magic High School and Outlaw Star, but there are many more examples).

But Starfinder doesn’t really have anything like that. There are spell ampules and spell gems… but those are 1-shot consumables, not the spellguns we want.  So I was going to post a few examples of spell guns last Friday… and realized I hadn’t written how how I figured the item level and cost of such things. So I delayed the article to today, and you get a enarly-double-length Monday article that both shows the design process I used, AND presents two sets of finished spellcasting weapons.

So how do we figure out the effective item level of a device that can cast detect magic using a battery, and how do we scale that against a baleful polymorph rifle?

Well, let’s start with something we CAN easily scale — damage. If we can find a relationship between damaging spells at each level and weapons that are roughly as effective, and spells of each level have roughly the same impact on the game as one another, that should allow us to set item levels for devices that create other spells effects of each level.

It’s best if we pick a few spells that come as close as possible to JUST doing damage at each level. We can then figure out a rough benchmark for the typical weaponlike damage each of these things does, looking back at our benchmarks for weapon damage. There’s some subjectivity there of course, but in general we can compare these to damage from weapons (treating a save and attack rolls to be about even in terms of damage-per-round options, and treating area or ongoing attacks as being 10-20% more damage for benchmark purposes) to tell us roughly what item level weapon does comparable damage.

We want two effective item levels (EIL) for each spell — one taken from the closest equivalent longarm or advanced melee weapon (representing an item used by people skilled in combat), and one taken from the closest 1-handed basic melee weapon or small arm (representing an item use by those unspecialized in combat). Those are listed with a slash as skilled/unspecialized. We’ll go into why we want those separate numbers in a moment.

Technomancer spells have the following exemplar damage spells at each spell level:

0-Level
Energy Ray (1d3, single target EAC ranged)  EIL – 0/1

1st-Level
Jolting Surge (4d6, single target EAC melee) EIL – 12/15
Overheat (2d8 energy in a cone, save for half) EIL – 11/15

2nd-Level
Caustic Conversion (4d6 energy, single target EAC ranged, ongoing damage) EIL – 13/18

3rd-Level
Arcing Surge (10d6 energy, line, save for half) EIL – 19/24
Explosive Blast (9d6 energy, radius, save for half) EIL –  19/24

Since we already hitting item level 19+ by 3rd level spells, it’s pretty clear 4th-level and higher spells would be beyond the scope of even 20th level equipment.

So, erring on the side of items that duplicate spells skewing up at lower item levels (as we not the benchmark damage for low-level weapons is a bit off, a weirdness the designers accepted so no one would actually have a weapon that did 1 point of damage), and standardizing the curve between skilled and unspecialized, we come up with the following typical item level for something that can reliable reproduce magic effects:

EIL by Spell Level
0-Level Spells: 3/8
1st-Level Spells: 11/16
2nd-Level Spells: 13/18
3rd-Level Spells: 19/24

We know from the price difference in spell gems vs spell ampules that giving a spellcaster access to more spells from their spell list is cheaper than allowing anyone to use that magic effect, so let’s use the same logic here. The lower “skilled” EIL is what we use for “Spell Guns,” which we define as only being able to be used by a character who can cast spells of the same spell level and class list as the one reproduced by the spell gun. So a microbot assault spell gun can only be used by a technomancer who can cast 2nd level spells.

The higher-level EIL we’ll use for Runethrowers. They function just like Spell Guns, except they can be used by anyone.

Also, we’ll use Small Arms proficiency for Spell Guns (so any spellcasting PC can use them), and Longarms for Runethrowers. Of course attack rolls won’t matter for all spell effects, but we’ll rule that any nonproficiency penalty you take with with a Runethrower impacts both any related save DCs, and reduces the Runethrower’s caster level.

We’re also going to ban any spells that require Resolve Points, have a casting time greater than 1 action, or require an experience material mentioned in the spell description. Otherwise each item casts a spell and works like a spell-like ability with a caster level equal to the item level, and all decisions made by whoever pulls the trigger.

So, borrowing some typical costs and battery usages from appropriate items:

Small Arms

SPELL GUNS                    Item     Credit      Spell
Name                              Level    Cost         Level   Battery  Usage
Spell Gun, Apprentice        3         1,500       0           20            2
Spell Gun, Mage               11       26,000       1           40            4
Spell Gun, Arcanist           13        52,000       2           80            8
Spell Gun, Archmage        19      600,000       3         100          10Spell Gun by info at nextmars dot com
(art by info@nextmars.com)

Longarms

RUNETHROWERS                 Item     Credit      Spell
Name                                    Level    Cost         Level   Battery  Usage
Runethrower, Neophyte       8          10,000       0           40            4
Runethrower, Warlock         16       180,000      1           80            8
Runethrower, Theurge         18       400,000      2         100            10Spell Rifle by info at nextmars dot com
(art by info@nextmars.com)

Runethrower (neophyte, Warlock, Theurge)
A runethrower is a hybrid weapon that contains a single spell of the listed level. It can convert energy from a battery into the energy needed for that spells, using a rune embedded within the weapon to provide all the eldritch control needed to create magic effects.
Only spells that can be cast in a single action or reaction can be placed in a runethrower (and always use a standard action to activate), and it must not have any Resolve Point cost or require any material with a cost (as noted in the spell description). A runethrower’s caster level is equal to its item level, and any decisions that need to be made when it creates a spell effect are decided by the user.
A runethrower can normally only have a single spell added into it. That spell can be changed to another spell of the same level by anyone with the ranks needed to craft the runethrower, at half the cost of creating a new runethrower. A runethrower can also have a additional spells of the same or lower level placed within it as Weapon Fusions (at the normal fusion cost, though it cannot be transferred from another weapon). Each weapon fusion of this type is treated as a weapon fusion with a level equal to 5 + the level of spell it contains. If a runethrower has multiple spells, the user decides which one to use each time it is activated.
Any penalty to attack rolls a character takes applies to a runethrower’s save DC, and if a character is nonproficient, that penalty also applies to the ruenthrower’s caster level when they use it.

Spell Guns (Apprentice, mage, Arcanist, Archmage)
A spell gun is a hybrid weapon that contains a single spell of the listed level. It can convert energy from a battery into the energy needed for that spells similar to a runethrower, but rather than have an internal rune that provides the directions to create a spell effect, requires an eldritch spark from the user to initiatie this conversion. Thus a character can only use a spell gun if they are of a class and level able to cast the spell contained within the spell gun (though it need not actually be a spell known).
Spell guns otherwise follow the rules for runethrowers.

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Fallback Feats for 5e, PF1, PF2, and Starfinder

Tuesday’s Fallback feats were a bit hit. Sadly, circumstances prevented me from posting two new rules-elements worth of content Wednesday.

So, today not only am I giving your four new Fallback feats, they all work in four game systems — 5e, PF1, PF2, and Starfinder. Though these these feats are written using Pathfinder 1e/Starfinder terminology and formatting (I didn’t take the time to write 4 slightly different versions of each), the actual feats and rules themselves work in all 4 game systems.

These feats all fallow the normal Fallback Feat rules.

ELDRITCH BACKLASH [Fallback]
Your magic harms those that ignore it.
Benefit: When you cast a 1st level or higher spell that does not affect any creatures or significant objects you target or that are in the area, one target of your choice with an AC no greater than 15 + your caster level takes damage equal to one weapon in your possession with which you are proficient (without adding any bonus damage from ability scores, feats, or special abilities), or 5 HP per level of the spell, whichever is greater.

LEARN FROM FAILURE [Fallback]
You are constantly analyzing your efforts, and even when you do not succeed, you may learn something useful from your failure.
Benefit: When you fail at an attack roll or an ability check or skill check to identify, recall lore about, disarm, disable, or bypass a creature, trap, or hazard, or survive or get along in the wilderness, you may immediately make an appropriate ability or skill check to learn one new relevant fact about the creature, object, or region involved at the normal skill DC to learn information or recall knowledge. Multiple failed checks can reveal multiple new pieces of information without the DC increasing.

Fallback Entangled
(Art by GrandFailure)

SIMMERING RAGE [Fallback]
Even when a foe incapacitates you, your anger at being sidelined grows.
Benefit: When you are unwillingly bound, charmed, enchanted, entangled, grabbed, grappled, held, paralyzed, petrified, or magically slept by a foe (or foe’s trap or hazard) during a combat encounter in such a way that you cannot take any effective actions, you gain a +1 bonus to saving throws, rolls, or checks to end the situation incapacitating you (if any), which is cumulative if you are incapacitated for multiple rounds.
Additionally when you stop being incapacitating, you gain a +4 bonus to any attack roll or skill check you make in your first full around, and tot he save DC of any spell or ability you use that round.

STREAKBREAKER [Fallback]
Your bad luck doesn’t last forever.
Benefit: When you fail an attack roll or skill check roll (not including taking 10 or taking 20) and your d20 result for the check was 11 or worse, you gain a +1 luck bonus to all attack rolls and skill checks where you make a d20 roll until you succeed at one. If you already have a luck bonus active from this feat when you qualify for it again, you luck bonus increased by 1 until you succeed at a skill check or attack roll.

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Fallback Feats for Pathfinder 1e

It can be frustrating, as a player, to have your entire round go by without doing anything effective. It’s especially frustrating when you tried to do something cool, and the end result is nothing but wasted effort.

On the other hand, if you can’t fail at things, the thrill of success is dimmed.

But failure can be relative. When you lob a fireball at a group of giants and they all make their save, they at least take SOME damage. If you lob a fireball at a group of ninja with evasion, the end result may be doing no damage at all.

Ideally, the game moves along fast enough you can shrug off the bad round and look forward to more opportunities. But that isn’t always the case, and some players seem to have the bad luck to be totally ineffective multiple rounds in a row… and that’s no fun.

Enter the fallback feat… an entirely untested idea on how to make failure less frustrating.

Fallback Feats
Fallback feats only function in rounds when you have not taken any action that exceeded a foe’s CMD, caused a foe to take damage, or caused a foe to fail a saving throw. Ongoing events from previous rounds can do those things, but if any action you take manages one of those effects, your fallback feat does not function that round. Fallback feats also require you to have attempted some specific actions, which must also fail in order for the feat to function.

Fallback Witch
(Art by Roman)

ELDRITCH BOLSTER [Fallback]
When your magic energy fails to effect any foe, it instead bolsters your health.
Prerequisites: Caster level 1st
Benefit: When you cast a spell that has an effect other than to deal damage, and it is entirely negated by saving throws or spell resistance, you gain temporary hit points equal to double the spell’s level. These hp do not stack with other temp hp gained from this feat, and last for 10 minutes or until expended.

HONED DEFENSES [Fallback]
When your efforts to harm your foes fail, you instinctively step up your defenses.
Prerequisites: Caster level 1st or base attack bonus +1
Benefit: When you have made at least one attack that could deal damage, or used a damage-dealing ability or spell, and no foe or targeted object took damage as a result, you gain a +2 bonus to your AC, CMD, and saving throws. You apply this bonus to the next attacks made against you or saves you make before the beginning of your next turn. The bonus applies to a maximum number of attacks or saves equal to the number of attacks you made or creatures you targeted or had in a damaging area.

For example, if you caught three ninja in a fireball and damaged none of them, and didn’t take any other effective actions this round, you apply your Honed Defenses bonus to the next three attacks or saves you make before the beginning of your next turn.

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The Torchbearer Archetype for the 5e Mascot Class

Tuesday we laid out the concept and framework for the Mascot class for 5e, Wednesday we presented the Domestic Companion option for that class, and Thursday we presenting the Inspiring Failure class feature.

So, it’s time to present our other initial archetype, the Torchbearer.

Mascot Archetype
At 1st level, you choose an archetype that defines what kind of mascot you are, and gives you some idea how other PCs and NPCs are likely to see and treat your character. You can choose from the Domestic Creature or Torchbearer archetypes.

The archetype you choose grants you features at 1st level and again at 7th, 10th, 15th, and 18th level.

5e Torchbearer
(art by Zdenek Sasek)

Torchbearer
You are a dedicated assistant to adventurers and heroes. You may not actually carry a torch of course — you might be a young squire with a mace, a farmer with a pitchfork, or a hireling with more loyalty than your employers know. You don’t think of yourself as a hero, but you will aid them however you can. You spend a great deal of time carrying torches to light their way, bringing them lost weapons, and standing beside them in the darkest moments so they do not have to face such risks alone.

A Light In The Darkness
Beginning when you take this archetype at 1st level, your plucky courage and willingness to take the same risks as your allies moves them to be their very best. This ability, and all your other torchbearer abilities, only function after a round when you do not make an attack or cast a spell. If you take either of those actions, no torchbearer ability functions until after the beginning of your next turn.
When an ally within 30 feet makes an attack roll or saving throw, you may choose to roll 1d20 as well. If your result is better than the ally’s (or both of the ally’s, if they have advantage), they make take your d20 rather than use their own die results. Once an ally chooses to use your d20 result, you cannot use this ability again until after the end of your next turn.

How Dare!
You friends are offended when enemies harm you. At 7th level, if a foe successfully hits you with an attack, or forces you to make a saving throw you fail, one ally of your choice within 60 feet gains advantage on their next attack against that foe. Only one ally can have this benefit at a time, and it must be used within 2 rounds.

Over My Dead Body
At 10th level when you are adjacent to an ally, and an enemy targets that ally (with an attack or a spell or effect that selects targets rather than an area), you can use your reaction to cause the attack or effect to target you instead. The effect otherwise works normally (requiring attack rolls to hit or allowing saving throws as appropriate), just with you rather than your ally as the target.

It’s Good To Have Friends
Those who harm you find your allies wroth. At 15th level when an ally attacks a foe that has within the past day damaged you, or created an effect or cast a spell you failed a saving throw against, and the attack is a success you can use your reaction to make it a critical success instead.

Don’t Be Dead
So great is your grief at seeing the fall of the heroes you have spent your life helping, the universe itself responds by keeping them just at the brink of death’s door. As an action you can attend an adjacent ally who died within 1 minute as a result of massive damage or from failing a third death save. The ally turns out to have never quite died, regains a number of hit points equal to your level (or half it’s maximum, whichever is less), and becomes conscious. Once you use this ability, you cannot do so again until you take a long rest.

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The Mascot Class, for 5e

There’s a character that shows up fairly often in fantasy fiction, that is rarely taken as a player concept in RPGs. This is the brave hireling who tries to defend you with a cooking pot, the gardener and family friend who carries you when your legs give out, the faithful tutor who takes an assassin’s dagger so you can defeat the villain.

They aren’t mages, or warriors, or treasure acquisition experts. They are commoners or civilians, who love the heroes enough to go with them, and are often described as the “heart” of the group… because “hanger-on and potential hostage” doesn’t sound as complimentary.

Basically, they are adventuring group mascots. They DO make appearances as NPCs in some games, and I have seen GMs do great jobs with them. But I also know a lot of players who would LOVE to roleplay the team mascot… as long as they could still DO something.

And I think it’s possible to build a class that gives a player game options that are fun, while still preserving the “civilian” nature of a mascot.

I think this idea works REALLY well for 5e, so I am using that for my framework. We’ll need to start with some basics.

ErgaTheMagnanimous-color-01
(Art by Jacob Blackmon)

Mascot Class Features
As a mascot, you gain the following class features.

Hit Points
Hit Dice: 1d6 per mascot level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 12 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d12 (or 8) + your Constitution modifier per mascot level after 1st

Proficiencies
Armor: Shields
Weapons: Simple weapons
Tools: Pick any four
Saving Throws: Wisdom, Constitution
Skills: Choose two skills from Animal Handling, Insight, Investigation, Medicine, Perception, Survival, and Religion

Equipment
You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:
(a) a simple weapon and a shield or two simple weapons
(a) Two tools you are proficient with
(a) a dungeoneer’s pack or (b) an explorer’s pack

Table: The Mascot
Level Proficiency Bonus Bonus Features
1st +2 Mascot Archetype
2nd +2 Shtick
3rd +2 Inspiring failure (one use)
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement
5th +3 Schick
6th +3 Ability Score Improvement
7th +3 Mascot Archetype feature
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement
9th +4 Schick
10th +4 Mascot Archetype feature
11th +4 Inspiring failure (two uses)
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement
13th +5 Shtick
14th +5 Ability Score Improvement
15th +5 Mascot Archetype feature
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement
17th +6 Inspiring failure (three uses), shtick
18th +6 Mascot Archetype feature
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement
20th +6 Inspiring failure (four uses)

Okay with that we can begin to build out the game options. So, what are the mascot archetypes?! What shticks can you pick from?! How does FAILURE inspire?

Come back over the course of the week, and we’ll investigate these intriguing options.

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Magus Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re wrapping up this week of Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We were focusing on the classes from the COM — we did the biohacker Monday, the vanguard on Tuesday, and the witchwarper on Wednesday. You can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG.

That covers all the official Starfinder classes for now… but goodness knows there are some great Starfinder-compatible classes products by other companies, including my own Rogue Genius Games. We got a request to do the magus legacy class found in the Starfarer’s Companion. So, let’s apply the themetype treatment to that, shall we?

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

SF Magus
(art by Sonsogyeka)

Magus ThemeType
The idea of blending magic and combat has always appealed to you, and while you ultimately followed a different path, you learned enough of the arts of the magi to impact your tactics and options

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): At 1st level you gain a +1 to Intelligence. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level) You gain Mysticism as a class skill. If it is already a class skill, you instead gain a +1 bonus to all Mysgicism checks. You reduce the DC of Mysticism checks to identify magic weapons, fusions, and fusion seals by 5.

Minor Magus Magic (Sp, Archetype, 2nd Level): Select one 1st level magus spell. You can cast this spell once per day. Select two 0-level magus spells. You can cast these spells at will. Your caster level for all magus spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType is equal to your character level, and you use your key ability score for all calculations that normally draw on the magus’s key ability score.

Basic Magus Magic (Sp, Archetype, 4th Level): Select two 1st level magus spells. You have two 1st-level magus spell slots per day you can use for any combination of the 1st-level magus spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType. This replaces the 1st level spell you gained from minor magus. Also select a third 0-level magus spells. You can cast this spell at will.

Basic Spell Combat (Theme, 6th Level) You gain the spell combat class ability for spells from any class, but once you use it you cannot use it again until you expend a Resolve Point to regain Stamina Points following a 10-minute rest.

Minor Magus Arcana (Ex, Archetype, 6th Level) You gain one magus arcana. You treat your magus level as being 2/3 your character level for all arcana gained from this Multiclass ThemeType.

Improved Basic Spell Combat (Theme, 9th Level) When you use spell combat, your spell now does not provoke an attack of opportunity if it’s spell level is no greater than (1/3 your character level) -2.

Basic Arcane Weapon (Theme, 12th Level) You gain the arcane weapons class feature of the magus. You treat your magus level as half your character level.

Advanced Magus Magic (Sp, Archetype, 12th Level): Select one 2nd level magus spells. You can cast this spell once per day.

Full Spell Combat (Theme, 18th Level) There is no no limit to how often you can use spell combat.

Greater Magus Magic (Ex, Archetype, 18th Level) Select one 3rd level magus spell. You may cast this spell once per day.

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Ranger Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re continuing this week with Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We’re focusing on the classes from the COM. We did the biohacker Monday, the vanguard on Tuesday, and the witchwarper on Wednesday. You can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG.

That covers all the official Starfinder classes for now… but goodness knows there are some great Starfinder-compatible classes products by other companies, including my own Rogue Genius Games. Among the most popular of these is the legacy ranger class, which can be found in the Starfarer’s Companion. So, let’s apply the themetype treatment to that, shall we?

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

Ranger ThemeType
You have always been at home in the wilderness. Your work or calling may have prevented you from focusing on your love of nature, but you remain comfortable and competent when you find yourself in the wild.

SF Ranger
(Art by Digital Storm)

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): Pick a ranger style. At 1st level you gain a +1 to the ability score linked to that style. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level) You gain Survival as a class skill. If it is already a class skill, you instead gain a +1 bonus to all Survival checks. You reduce the DC of Survival checks to endure severe weather and orienteering by 5.

Minor Ranger Ways (Ex, Archetype, 2nd Level) Select one ranger class skill. You gain 1 bonus rank in this skill, which cannot exceed your normal maximum skill ranks. You gain an additional bonus skill rank at 4th level, and ever even class level thereafter.

Minor Ranger Ways (Ex, Archetype, 4th Level) Select one ranger class skill you did not select with ranger ways. You gain 1 bonus rank in this skill, which cannot exceed your normal maximum skill ranks. You gain an additional bonus skill rank at 6th level, and ever even class level thereafter.

Basic Study Target (Theme, 6th Level) You gain the ranger study target class ability. Your bonus never increases beyond the base +1.

Minor Ranger Methodology (Ex, Archetype, 6th Level) You gain one ranger methodology, selected from the 2nd level ranger methodologies.

Minor Ranger Style (Theme, 9th Level) You gain the first ability of your ranger theme, treating your ranger level as half your character level.

Improved Ranger Style (Theme, 12th Level) You gain the second ability of your ranger theme.

Improved Ranger Methodology (Ex, Archetype, 12th Level) You gain one ranger methodology, selected from the 2nd or 8th level ranger methodologies.

Greater Ranger Style (Theme, 18th Level) You gain the third ability of your ranger theme, and now treat your ranger level as 2/3 your character level.

Greater Ranger Methodology (Ex, Archetype, 18th Level) You gain one ranger methodology, selected from the 2nd, 8th, or 14th  level ranger methodologies.

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Witchwarper Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re continuing this week with Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We’re focusing on the classes from the COM. We did the biohacker Monday, the vanguard on Tuesday, and you can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG. So today, we continue the trend and cover the witchwarper.

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

SF Witchwarper
(art by sogsonyeka)

Witchwarper ThemeType
You have always seen flickers of other realities out of the corner of your eye, felt the breeze from parallel worlds, found yourself thinking about pasts that never happened. Unlike a true witchwarper you have never been able to devout yourself to the study and expansion of these powers, but they grow in small ways within you regardless.

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): At 1st level you gain a +1 to your Charisma score. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level): At first level, you gain two of the following skills of your choice as class skills: Bluff, Diplomacy, or Mysticism. For each selected skill, if you have the skill as a class skill from other sources at 1st level, you instead gain a +1 bonus to that skill. Once these choices are made, they cannot be changed.

Minor Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 2nd Level): Select one 1st level witchwarper spell. You can cast this spell once per day. Select two 0-level witchwarper spells. You can cast these spells at will. Your caster level for all witchwarper spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType is equal to your character level, and you use your key ability score for all calculations that normally draw on the witchwarper’s key ability score.

Basic Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 4th Level): Select two 1st level witchwarper spells. You have two 1st-level witchwarper spell slots per day you can use for any combination of the 1st-level witchwarper spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType. This replaces the 1st level spell you gained from minor witchwarper. Also select a third 0-level witchwarper spells. You can cast this spell at will.

Minor Infinite Worlds (Theme, 6th Level): You gain access to the 1st-level infinite worlds power. If you attach this themetype to a spellcasting class, you can create those effects with your own spells. If you attack this is a themetype without spells, you can create the infinite worlds once per day as if using a spell with a spell level equal to 1/3 your class level.

Minor Paradigm Shift (Sp, Archetype, 6th Level): Select one paradigm shift from the list of 2nd level paradigm shifts.

Intermediate Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 9th Level): Select one 2nd level witchwarper spell. You may cast this spell once per day.

Improved Infinite Worlds (Theme, 12th Level): If you have attached this themetype to a spellcasting class, you gain access to the 2nd and 3rd level infinite worlds effects. If you have attached this to a nonspellcasting class, you gain access to 2nd level infinite worlds effect, and can now use the ability twice per day.

Advanced Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype, 12th Level): Select two 2nd level witchwarper spells. You have two 2nd-level witchwarper spell slots per day you can use for any combination of the 2nd-level witchwarper spells gained from this Multiclass ThemeType. This replaces the 2nd level spell you gained from intermediate witchwarping.

Greater Infinite Worlds (Theme, 18th Level): If you have attached this themetype to a spellcasting class, you gain access to the 4th level infinite worlds effects. If you have attached this to a nonspellcasting class, you gain access to 3rd level infinite worlds effect.

Greater Witchwarping (Sp, Archetype 18th): Select one 3rd level witchwarper spell. You can cast this spell once per day.

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Vanguard Multiclass ThemeType (For Starfinder)

We’re starting this week with Multiclass ThemeTypes, which give you some abilities of a second character class but counts as both your theme and as an archetype for the first class you take levels in. We’re focusing on the classes from the COM. We did the biohacker yesterday, and you can pick up the pdf of multiclass themetypes for all the classes from the Core Rulebook at DriveThruRPG.

Multiclass ThemeType abilities marked with (Theme) occur when you reach the listed character level, regardless of what classes you have taken levels in. Those marked (Archetype) are gained only when you reach the listed level in the first character class you take levels in. However, it is also recommended that characters with a Multiclass ThemeType not be allowed to also use normal multiclassing rules (in which case the character’s character level and class level will always match).

A character cannot take class levels in the class that matches their Multiclass ThemeType.

SF vanguard
(art by sogsonyeka)

Vanguard ThemeType
While you lack the in-depth level of training and devotion of a full vanguard, you have studied the supernatural arts of manipulating entropy, and apply it to your pursuits. This does not give you the mighty entropic strike vanguards possess, or their extreme level of durability, but it can swing situations in your favor in ways your foes do not expect.

Key Ability Boost (Theme, 1st level): At 1st level you gain a +1 to your Constitution score. This acts as the normal +1 to ability score gained from a theme.

Theme Knowledge (Ex, Theme, 1st Level): At first level, you gain either Acrobatics or Athletics as a class skill. If you have both of these as class skills from other sources at 1st level, you instead gain a +1 bonus to one of the two skills. Once these choices are made, they cannot be changed.

If you select Acrobatics, you may use your Acrobatics skill bonus as your Athletics skill bonus, and are considered trained in Athletics. If you select Athletics, you may use your Athletics skill bonus as your Acrobatics skill bonus, and are considered trained in Acrobatics.

Minor Entropic Pool (Su, Archetype, 2nd Level): You gain a limited form of the vangaurd’s Entropic Pool ability. This acts as the entropic pool, but with the following modifications.

*When combat begins, you do not gain an Entropy Point (EP)at the beg8nning of your first action. Your maximum entropy pool is 2 EP.
*You only gain entropy points by taking or receiving a critical hit in combat, or taking a full action to charge.
*You do not gain a bonus to AC for having an EP in your entropic pool.
*You can expend your EP to increase your speed, as outlined in the entropic pool class feature, or to add +1d4 damage to an unarmed attack.

Minor Mitigate (Ex, Archetype, 4th Level): You can now use EP for a weakened version of the vanguard mitigate ability. You only reduce damage by an amount equal to half your class level.

Basic Aspect (Ex, Archetype, 6th Level): Select one vanguard aspect. You gain the aspect insight of that aspect.

Basic Discipline (Ex, Theme, 6th Level): You gain one vanguard discipline, selected from the list of 2nd level vanguard disciplines. You treat your character level as your vanguard level for all vanguard disciplines gained from this themetype.

Improved Aspect (Ex, Archetype, 9th Level): You gain aspect embodiment of your aspect.

Improved Discipline (Ex, Theme, 12th Level): You gain one vanguard discipline, selected from the list of 2nd or 6th level vanguard disciplines.

Improved Entropic Pool (Ex, Archetype, 12th Level): Your entropic pool now gains EP in all the normal ways, and has a maxmum of 4 EP.

Greater Discipline (Ex, Theme, 18th Level): You gain one vanguard discipline, selected from the list of 2nd, 6th, or 10th level vanguard disciplines.

Greater Aspect (Ex, Archetype 18th): You now gain the aspect catalyst of your aspect, but not the improved aspect catalyst.

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